Menu
The New Contemporary Art Magazine

Stefan Glerum Designs 60ft-high Stained Glass Facade in Amsterdam

Dutch artist Stefan Glerum has an illustration style that lends perfectly to stained glass, his latest venture. In his traditional artwork, we can see the influence of Art Deco and Japanese woodblock prints, with figures drawn in bold lines against vibrantly colored backgrounds with unusual angles of view. His simple and flat way of drawing is also reminiscent of Bauhaus, Italian Futurism and Russian Constructivism, which he credits as his inspiration. Glerum most recently applied his design sensibility to the Polderweg in Amsterdam, a housing complex of 72 apartments and impressive 60 foot cathedral-high stained glass windows.

Dutch artist Stefan Glerum has an illustration style that lends perfectly to stained glass, his latest venture. In his traditional artwork, we can see the influence of Art Deco and Japanese woodblock prints, with figures drawn in bold lines against vibrantly colored backgrounds with unusual angles of view. His simple and flat way of drawing is also reminiscent of Bauhaus, Italian Futurism and Russian Constructivism, which he credits as his inspiration. Glerum most recently applied his design sensibility to the Polderweg in Amsterdam, a housing complex of 72 apartments and impressive 60 foot cathedral-high stained glass windows. His colorful window designs for the building, designed by Heren 5 Architects for Ymere, illustrate the social history of the site. There are references to the former Oostergasfabriek, a 19th century gas factory, the old swimming baths, and a former animal shelter, as well as personal stories from local people. Take a look at more photos of the project below, courtesy of the artist.

Meta
Share
Facebook
Reddit
Pinterest
Email
Related Articles
Judith Schaechter draws on Catholic iconography, contemporary culture, and Greek mythology to create stained glass works of art that recall Hieronymus Bosch's chaotic hellscapes. Based in Philadelphia, Schaechter has work in the permanent collections of several world-renowned museums: Metropolitan Museum in New York, the Victoria and Albert Museum in London, the Hermitage in St. Petersburg, Russia, the Philadelphia Museum of Art, The Corning Museum of Glass, and The Renwick Gallery of the Smithsonian Institution. She utilizes the timeworn art form of stained glass to create dark, surreal narratives that are quite removed from the religious imagery we typically expect from this medium.
Working with stained glass is not something that one can do without practice. After a year of apprenticing under veteran glass masters, San Francisco based artist Victor Solomon got to master this delicate craft himself. He has always been a big basketball fan, so it felt only natural that he turn his skills onto basketball backboards, which he transforms into works of art. Each backboard in his series titled "Literally Balling" is ornamented with luxurious materials and gems, including the net and rim.
Self-taught Scottish artist Pinkie Maclure crafts stained glass works tackling contemporary themes while acknowledging the form's history. The artist recently won the Zealous Emerge Craft Prize for her work, described as reinventing “a medieval art form to question the modern world, through darkly humorous stories and wryly observed imagery.”
There's a magical quality in the stained glass work of Erlend Tait, a Scottish artist who offers both a contemporary slant to the form and observes its traditions. He packs these works with the symbolism and vibrancy that recall ancient craftsman, yet his figures are representative of the modern, diverse populous.

Subscribe to the Hi-Fructose Mailing List