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Jeremyville Debuts Character Sculptures with a Message in Bangkok

In 2010, street artist and character designer Jeremyville began posting a series of daily illustrations at his blog called "The Jeremyville Community Service Announcments." In his quirky and colorful style, those simple images and words resonated with people online and before long, the project went viral. Today, there are over 500 announcements in the series. In theme, it touches upon pop-culture topics and as Jeremyville describes, "everything about what it means to be human." For his current exhibition at Groove@CentralWorld in Bangkok, Jeremyville reimagined some of his most popular CSA's as giant sculptures. 

In 2010, street artist and character designer Jeremyville began posting a series of daily illustrations at his blog called “The Jeremyville Community Service Announcments.” In his quirky and colorful style, those simple images and words resonated with people online and before long, the project went viral. Today, there are over 500 announcements in the series. In theme, it touches upon pop-culture topics and as Jeremyville describes, “everything about what it means to be human.” For his current exhibition at Groove@CentralWorld in Bangkok, Jeremyville reimagined some of his most popular CSA’s as giant sculptures. Titled “A Trip to Jeremyville,” his exhibition also features streetscapes and new messages from the series – messages like “Don’t Be So Square,” featuring a circle-shaped SpongeBob SquarePants, and “Own Your Own Strangeness,” one of his new sculptures. While his characters are fun to look at, there is a more serious intention behind them. Having already visited cities like Hong Kong, Belgium, Paris, and Italy, Jeremyville hopes to inspire the same positivity and productivity in Thailand. He is a believer in the power of art as communication, and that an unforgettable image can help change the world.

“A Trip to Jeremyville” is now on view at Groove@CentralWorld, Bangkok through December (closing date to be determined).

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