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Allyson Mellberg’s Drawings Imagine Futuristic Biology in “The Planet of Doubt”

Allyson Mellberg draws futuristic biological advancements inspired by science fiction. In her latest solo show at LJ Gallery in Paris, "The Planet of Doubt," Mellberg renders human characters covered in strange growths that resemble rocks, leaves, and sea urchins. The work enters ambiguous territory as, in some pieces, the characters appear pockmarked and disease-ridden, while in others, their strange appendages seem to give them superhuman powers. The drawings allude to the power of communing with nature and meditation to help us transcend our circumstances and deal with chronic anxiety and sickness.

Allyson Mellberg draws futuristic biological advancements inspired by science fiction. In her latest solo show at LJ Gallery in Paris, “The Planet of Doubt,” Mellberg renders human characters covered in strange growths that resemble rocks, leaves, and sea urchins. The work enters ambiguous territory as, in some pieces, the characters appear pockmarked and disease-ridden, while in others, their strange appendages seem to give them superhuman powers. The drawings allude to the power of communing with nature and meditation to help us transcend our circumstances and deal with chronic anxiety and sickness.

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