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Preview: Zio Ziegler’s “Intuitivism” at LeQuiVive Gallery

San Francisco-based artist Zio Ziegler's work requires two levels of the viewer's attention. There are the large figures almost always present in his canvases, drawings and murals — Cubist-inspired bodies whose heads and limbs appear splayed out the surface. Ziegler stitches together these characters with intricate, collage-like patterns that often evoke indigenous, South American folk art forms. The repeating patterns within each figure inform our understand of the larger whole. His solo show "Intuitivism" opens tomorrow, November 15, at LeQuiVive Gallery in Oakland. Earlier this week, the artist painted a large-scale mural on the corner of 17th St. and Webster St. Take a look at some photos of the mural as well as a preview of the exhibition below.

San Francisco-based artist Zio Ziegler’s work requires two levels of the viewer’s attention. There are the large figures almost always present in his canvases, drawings and murals — Cubist-inspired bodies whose heads and limbs appear splayed out the surface. Ziegler stitches together these characters with intricate, collage-like patterns that often evoke indigenous, South American folk art forms. The repeating patterns within each figure inform our understand of the larger whole. His solo show “Intuitivism” opens tomorrow, November 15, at LeQuiVive Gallery in Oakland. Earlier this week, the artist painted a large-scale mural on the corner of 17th St. and Webster St. Take a look at some photos of the mural as well as a preview of the exhibition below.

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