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Preview: Marc Giai-Miniet’s “Théâtre de la Mémoire” at Jonathan LeVine Gallery

Like tiny movie sets that recall the color-coded cinematography of Wes Anderson, Marc Giai-Miniet's sculptural dioramas reinterpret real-life, utilitarian settings. The artist (who we introduced on the blog recently) builds doll house-like architecture that evokes factories and workshops, turning these industrial spaces into whimsical settings filled with strange objects that seem precariously organized. Each room is stuffed to its brim, and it takes time for the eye to traverse the different compartments of each piece. While Giai-Miniet is a recognized artist in his native France with a long career behind him, he will debut his first US solo show at NYC's Jonathan LeVine Gallery on October 11, "Théâtre de la Mémoire." Take a look at some of his new works for the exhibition below.

Like tiny movie sets that recall the color-coded cinematography of Wes Anderson, Marc Giai-Miniet’s sculptural dioramas reinterpret real-life, utilitarian settings. The artist (who we introduced on the blog recently) builds doll house-like architecture that evokes factories and workshops, turning these industrial spaces into whimsical settings filled with strange objects that seem precariously organized. Each room is stuffed to its brim, and it takes time for the eye to traverse the different compartments of each piece. While Giai-Miniet is a recognized artist in his native France with a long career behind him, he will debut his first US solo show at NYC’s Jonathan LeVine Gallery on October 11, “Théâtre de la Mémoire.” Take a look at some of his new works for the exhibition below.

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