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Walk Through Turn the Page: The First Ten Years of Hi-Fructose

Earlier today, we brought you photos from Saturday night's opening of Turn the Page: The First Ten Years of Hi-Fructose, a bi-coastal collaboration between the magazine and Virginia MOCA. Now, we'd like to give you a closer look at the art and see what it's like to walk through the halls of this unprecedented group of 51 new contemporary artists from all genres and corners of the world.


Travis Louie

Earlier today, we brought you photos from Saturday night’s opening of Turn the Page: The First Ten Years of Hi-Fructose, a bi-coastal collaboration between the magazine and Virginia MOCA. Now, we’d like to give you a closer look at the art and see what it’s like to walk through the halls of this unprecedented group of 51 new contemporary artists from all genres and corners of the world.

To conceive and create a high quality art magazine is a considerable undertaking. To nurture your publication until it becomes a best-seller is an incredible accomplishment. That’s what artists and co-founders Attaboy and Annie Owens-Seifert did when they saw a need for an art magazine that celebrated diverse art that transcended genres. Turn the Page brings together names straight from the pages of Hi-Fructose who might not otherwise be found under the same roof:

AJ Fosik, Audrey Kawasaki, Barnaby Barford, Beth Cavener, Brian Dettmer, Brian McCarty, Camille Rose Garcia, Chris Berens, Erwin Wurm, Femke Hiemstra, Fulvio di Piazza, Gehard Demetz, Greg “Craola” Simkins, James Jean, Jean-Pierre Roy***, Jennybird Alcantara, Jeremy Geddes, Josh Keyes, Kate MacDowell***, Kazuki Takamatsu, Kehinde Wiley, Kevin Cyr, Kris Kuksi, Marion Peck, Marco Mazzoni, Mark Dean Veca, Mark Ryden, Martin Whitfooth, MARS-1, Nicola Verlato, Olek, Ray Caesar, Ron English, Sam Gibbons, Scott Hove, Shepard Fairey, Tara McPherson, Tiffany Bozic, Tim Biskup, Todd Schorr, Tracey Snelling, Travis Louie, Victor Castillo, Wayne White and Yoshitomo Nara.

Mark Dean Veca

Turn the Page: The First Ten Years of Hi-Fructose is presented by the City of Virginia Beach and supported through a generous grant from the National Endowment for the Arts. Additional support is provided by Acoustical Sheetmetal, Capital Group Companies, PRA Group, the Fine Family Fund, and other MOCA supporters as well as grants made possible by the Virginia Beach Arts and Humanities Commission, the Virginia Commission for the Arts, and the Business Consortium for Arts Support.

The exhibition is on view at the Virginia MOCA through December 31st, 2016. For more information about the exhibition, coinciding events and workshops, and tour stops, visit the museum’s website.


Yoshitomo Nara


AJ Fosik


Scott Musgrove


Left to right: Mars One, Jeff Soto


Mark Ryden


Brian Dettmer


Brian Dettmer, detail


Gary Taxali


Kris Kuksi


Kris Kuksi, detail


Barnaby Barford


Todd Schorr


Josh Keyes


Nicola Verlato


Audrey Kawasaki


Left to right: Camille Rose Garcia, Audrey Kawasaki


Kehinde Wiley


Tracey Snelling


Left to right: Tiffany Bozic, Kazuki Takamatsu


Left to right: Barnaby Barford, James Jean


Tara McPherson


Jeremy Geddes


Wim Delvoye

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