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Ceren Aksungur’s Unsettling Mixed-Media Illustrations

Ceren Aksungur, also known as Dolce Paganne, is an Antwerp-based artist who crafts surreal, unsettling drawings and paintings. Her work combines both the strange and the mundane, subverting the everyday. Works such as "Pomegrenade," implement both acrylics and colored pencil on paper.

Ceren Aksungur, also known as Dolce Paganne, is an Antwerp-based artist who crafts surreal, unsettling drawings and paintings. Her work combines both the strange and the mundane, subverting the everyday. Works such as “Pomegrenade,” implement both acrylics and colored pencil on paper.

The artist worked at advertising agencies in Istanbul before beginning a career in illustration. “Artist (focuses) her surreal drawings on ambiguous situations of daily life, where she plays with human/animal figures in a psychedelic manner,” a statement says. “By following the path of ancient occult myths, she seeks to create her own visual esoteric language to tell some new stories.”

See more of her work below.


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