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Bob Dob’s Recent, Punk-Infused Paintings

Bob Dob's punk rock roots still shine through the artist's paintings, including these recent pieces. Works like “Golden Punk God Made of Clay,” with a statue inspired by Pennywise guitarist Fletcher Dragge and the band’s ongoing influence. Elsewhere in the painting, the work shows "various mischief and local South Bay culture and folklore," the artist says. Dob is featured in the Hi-Fructose Collected 3 Box Set.

Bob Dob‘s punk rock roots still shine through the artist’s paintings, including these recent pieces. Works like “Golden Punk God Made of Clay,” with a statue inspired by Pennywise guitarist Fletcher Dragge and the band’s ongoing influence. Elsewhere in the painting, the work shows “various mischief and local South Bay culture and folklore,” the artist says. Dob is featured in the Hi-Fructose Collected 3 Box Set.


“I love to create worlds where the dark side of human nature is present,” the artist says. “Life isn’t always good times. While in our youth we experience many things we would rather forget but this is what defines us. That’s why my characters have an adolescent quality to them. I’ve been very fortunate in experiencing and hearing many great stories in my life which now find their way into my paintings.”

See more of Dob’s recent work below.

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