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Alessandro Boezio’s Sculptures Remix Human Anatomy

If the Addams' family's Thing multiplied and mutated, it would resemble something like Alessandro Boezio's sculptures. The artist works in clay and fiber glass to create creepy-crawly anatomical forms that remix the human body. Boezio is particularly fascinated with hands and feet, often mingling digits and limbs in unholy ways. Though there's nothing particularly explicit about his work, seeing severed hands standing up by themselves without a body attached is enough to make our skin crawl.

If the Addams’ family’s Thing multiplied and mutated, it would resemble something like Alessandro Boezio’s sculptures. The artist works in clay and fiber glass to create creepy-crawly anatomical forms that remix the human body. Boezio is particularly fascinated with hands and feet, often mingling digits and limbs in unholy ways. Though there’s nothing particularly explicit about his work, seeing severed hands standing up by themselves without a body attached is enough to make our skin crawl.

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