Armory Arts Week 2014: SCOPE New York Recap

by Soojin ChangPosted on

Blackbook gallery install

Walking through SCOPE Art Show this past weekend felt very much like navigating through a labyrinth, as this year’s galleries boasted exceptionally creative uses of space at Moynihan Station within the New York City Post Office. With over 68 exhibitors from 22 countries, the booths that particularly stood out were ones that not only featured strong works, but ones that provided the harmonic impression of private mini-exhibitions within the realities of a packed trade show.

Black Book Gallery’s booth was curated in two parts: a trifold wall of bold, iconic works hung side by side, ceiling to floor, creating a nearly overwhelming level of visual density, which was immediately relieved by its opposing wall of all-white works by Hari & Deepti — a collection of storybook illustrations delicately cut out of paper, illuminated by LED.

Over at Thinkspace, Know Hope and Amy Sol each featured a body of work independently from the other represented artists of the gallery. Know Hope’s collection titled “These Traintracks, They Remain, Ungrudged by the Passing Through” combines ink drawings of fragile characters with found objects, and are framed with worn-down, vintage wood. Just as intricately serene, yet done in an entirely contrasting approach, are Amy Sol’s dreamy, soft-hued paintings of nymph-creatures and her animal friends. The artist, who is possibly the only human to resemble the fantastical pixies of her own paintings, was in New York for the opening of the show.

Hari & Deepti. The One Who Walks Alone. Hand cut paper illuminated with LED. Black Book Gallery.

Indie 184 (top left), Morning Breath (bottom left), CYRCLE (center top and bottom) and Judith Supine (far right) for Blackbook Gallery

Shepard Fairey and Jay West at Blackbook Gallery.

Black Book Gallery. Left: Ravi Zupa. Watercolor, colored pencil, and ink on paper mounted to wood panel.Right: WK Interact. Mixed media on wood.

Oil paintings by Adam Caldwell, Seth Armstrong, Kwon Kyungyup, and David Cooley at Thinkspace Gallery.

Kevin Peterson and Soey Milk for Thinkspace (left to right).

Stephanie Buer, Dabs Myla, Craig ‘Skibs’ Barker, Erik Jones, Scott Radke and Alex Yanes for Thinkspace Gallery.

Works from Know Hope’s mini-exhibition at Thinkspace Gallery titled “These Traintracks, They Remain, Ungrudged by the Passing Through.”

Amy Sol. After The Rain (left) and Persied’s Rain (right). Acrylic on wood panel. Thinkspace Gallery.

Amy Sol. Evening Walk. Acrylic on wood panel. Thinkspace Gallery.

Erik Jones with his work at Thinkspace Gallery.

Amy Sol by her paintings at Thinkspace Gallery.

Naoto Hattori. Inner Eye. Acrylic on Canvas. Copro Gallery.

Kazuhiro Tsuji. Andy. Copro Gallery.

From left to right at C.A.V.E. Gallery: Tom French. Transient. Oil on canvas. Young Chun. Under the Stars (top). Feel Good Cocktail (bottom). Oil on canvas. Peeta. Resin sculpture and mixed media painting.

From left to right at C.A.V.E. Gallery: Zach Johnsen. Ephedrine. Graphite and watercolor on paper. Tom French. Transient. Oil on canvas. Young Chun. Under the Stars (top). Feel Good Cocktail (bottom). Oil on canvas.

Oil on panel works by Stephen Mackey at Arcadia Contemporary.

Oil on canvas works by Henrik Uldalen at Arcadia Contemporary.

Oil on canvas paintings by Kim Cogan.

Vinz Feel Free. Gouache and ink over old papers collage. Andenken Gallery.

Vered Aharonovitch. Untitled (bathtub). Polymers. Corridor Contemporary.

Foreground: Johnson Tsang. Open Mind. Porcelain. C. Emerson Fine Arts. Background (left to right): Teiji Hayama; Margaret Withers.

Works at C. Emerson Fine Arts, from left to right: Jason Snyder, Clayton Chandler, Scott Foster and Teiji Hayama

Ted Lawson. Crude. Emmanuel Fremin Gallery.

Banksy. The Grumpier You Are. Spraypaint on industrial truck. Art NOW NY.