by Roxanne GoldbergPosted on

Drawing with charcoal, Caroline Corbasson cuts, layers, and duplicates images of earth and space to convey the vast mysteries of the world and the universe beyond. Geological formations and celestial galaxies stretch, twist and split in the French artist’s works. Despite the enduring depths conveyed in her images, Corbasson’s choice of material suggests a state of impermanence within the universe. This interest in astronomical time is further apparent in the way Corbasson references archival renderings of space, such as Galileo’s 17th century drawings and late 20th century images taken by the Hubble Telescope, while also using contemporary and nuanced composition and display methods.

by CaroPosted on

When astronauts went to the moon in 1968 with the dream of discovering new worlds, something unexpected happened. They looked back, and for the first time, gazed upon the Earth. These otherworldly paintings by Slovakian painter Patricia Koysova capture the same sense of wonder in simplicity and scale. Her colorful images inspired by science blow natural environments out of context and proportion to admire their raw beauty. It’s as if Koysova has taken our most recognizable landmarks and placed them under a microscope. Her massive works zoom into icebergs until they become dramatic shades of bright blues, while the evolution of a star starts to look like entrails. Through their abstraction, we’re able to focus on the commonality of these seemingly different things. Read more after the jump!