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The Sculptures of Federico Clapis

The sculptures of Federico Clapis often play with our tether to technology, from the womb to the modern professional. The former stage, in particular, is where we find some of the artist’s most provocative work. He recently unveiled the above piece, a massive bronze figure, in London.

The sculptures of Federico Clapis often play with our tether to technology, from the womb to the modern professional. The former stage, in particular, is where we find some of the artist’s most provocative work. He recently unveiled the above piece, a massive bronze figure, in London.

https://www.instagram.com/p/BcrvYk_hgTl/

The artist has a particular relationship with social media, as someone who produced viral videos for some time that garnered millions of followers. “In September 2015, at the height of the media popularity, he decided to move away from pure entertainment and converted his online presence into a tool for the dissemination of his artistic works hitherto kept hidden,” his site says.

See more of his recent projects on his site.

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