Menu
The New Contemporary Art Magazine

The Paper Sculptures of Matthew Monahan

Matthew Monahan uses materials like paper to craft decidedly human and vulnerable sculptures. The artist’s entire practice uses a variety of materials. What carries through in each of his works is his penchant for conveying people in unexpected ways.

Matthew Monahan uses materials like paper to craft decidedly human and vulnerable sculptures. The artist’s entire practice uses a variety of materials. What carries through in each of his works is his penchant for conveying people in unexpected ways.

“Known for his mastery of both traditional and industrial materials, Monahan’s new works reflect a physical and mental tug of war with the history of figuration,” Anton Kern Gallery says. “For this show Monahan pushes beyond the individual icon, populating his works with unruly masses and subjecting his figures to an intractable struggle. Rendered primarily in black and white, the viewer is forced to zoom in and out across a pixelated optical field, where sculpture and painting overlap and crossfade.”

See more of Monahan’s work below.

Meta
Share
Facebook
Reddit
Pinterest
Email
Related Articles
The surreal sculptures of Jesse Thompson pair youthful figures with massive, weathered "lifecasts", revealing deeper themes within each scene. The artist says these narrative three-dimensional scenes are inspired by comics and other forms of sequential art.
Lana Crooks uses hand-dyed wool to craft the insides and outsides of the natural world. From a distance, these pieces appear to constructed of fur and bone. But upon closer inspection, the artist’s meticulous blending of wool, found objects, and other fabrics comes into focus. Crooks sometimes uses actual specimens from Chicago's natural history museum collections for inspiration in making her “faux specimens and soft curiosities.”
Andrea Salvatori subverts art-historical themes and motifs in his sculptures, reimagining the interior of Renaissance-style figures or unsettling forms emerging from pottery. He moves between traditional and digital means to execute these works.
In Yuanxing Liang’s folkloric sculptures, the hair of his figures become their own whimsical landscapes. Liang, formerly a game character designer, is now a full time artist, often working within fantastical figurative sculpture. Many have noted the challenge of displaying his work, as each pieces comes fully realized and detailed, 360 degrees of intricate notes from the artist.

Subscribe to the Hi-Fructose Mailing List