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Happy’s Garish, Voluminous Scenes

Vladislav Skobelskij, who works under the moniker Happy, creates voluminous, candy-colored scenes and animations. The delightfully garish works move between disturbing and alluring, each figure overcome by vibrant and cartoonish outgrowths. Happy often injects pop cultural and photographic elements into this fantasy world.

Vladislav Skobelskij, who works under the moniker Happy, creates voluminous, candy-colored scenes and animations. The delightfully garish works move between disturbing and alluring, each figure overcome by vibrant and cartoonish outgrowths. Happy often injects pop cultural and photographic elements into this fantasy world.

In particular, Happy has worked in Japanese influences, from manga to broader kawaii themes. The 33-year-old artist, hailing from Kiev, Ukraine, takes his work to both the screen and apparel. He says his work is a mix of drawing, collage, comics, and “the impact of the world.”

See more of the artist’s work below.

https://www.instagram.com/p/BjsZpMWgyFO/?taken-by=hahahaappy

https://www.instagram.com/p/BimJC3bgqA9/?taken-by=hahahaappy

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