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Tom French’s Cerebral ‘Parallax Paintings’

In Tom French's series "Parallax Paintings,” the artist’s fractured, stark approach has stirring effects. The artist limiting his palette adds to the cerebral nature of the work, with figure and abstractions blending in elegant cacophonies. In a statement, the artist’s work is described as looking at a spectrum, rather than a single state of mind.

In Tom French‘s series “Parallax Paintings,” the artist’s fractured, stark approach has stirring effects. The artist limiting his palette adds to the cerebral nature of the work, with figure and abstractions blending in elegant cacophonies. In a statement, the artist’s work is described as looking at a spectrum, rather than a single state of mind.

“Tom French’s artistic and intellectual investigations into the human psyche are an attempt to understand the flux and flow of our emotional reactions and reflections on our subjective self,” it says. “French chooses a monochrome palette, the simplicity of which allows for narrative without distraction and for the play of light and dark to expand in unexpectedly haunting ways.”

See more of French’s work below.

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