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Ai Yamaguchi’s Paintings Combined Traditional, Contemporary Themes

Ai Yamaguchi’s paintings combine traditional Japanese influences and notes of contemporary and pop iconography. Her work has a particularly feminine focus, finding both grace and strength in manga-influenced characters, often juxtaposed with geometric and off-kilter forms. The artist was last mentioned on HiFructose.com here and was featured in Hi-Fructose Vol. 33.

Ai Yamaguchi’s paintings combine traditional Japanese influences and notes of contemporary and pop iconography. Her work has a particularly feminine focus, finding both grace and strength in manga-influenced characters, often juxtaposed with geometric and off-kilter forms. The artist was last mentioned on HiFructose.com here and was featured in Hi-Fructose Vol. 33.


“Yamaguchi’s depictive techniques are informed by her unique assimilations of aspects of Japanese culture and customs, including calligraphy, waka poetry and traditional kimono patterns,” a statement says. “In her works’ supple linear qualities and reiterative patterns, accumulated flows of time seem to coexist with the beauty of a single moment in the seasons’ endless vicissitudes.”

See more of her work below.

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