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The Personal Work of Scott M. Fischer

Scott M. Fischer is widely known for his illustrative works, whether it’s comic book covers, kids' books, concept design, or game art. Yet his fine art practice, free from the confines of depicting set characters or situations, offers a different look at the artist. His hyperdetailed, dreamlike works recall both classical influences and a contemporary edge, while blending digital and traditional tools.

Scott M. Fischer is widely known for his illustrative works, whether it’s comic book covers, kids’ books, concept design, or game art. Yet his fine art practice, free from the confines of depicting set characters or situations, offers a different look at the artist. His hyperdetailed, dreamlike works recall both classical influences and a contemporary edge, while blending digital and traditional tools.

When asked what to do when he’s in a rut during illustration, he offered this to Wendy Martin Illustration: “Sketchbook, sketchbook sketchbook. Just draw your way through it. Draw things that aren’t even related. Tickle the idea, give your subconscious a name and let he or she work on the idea while you do something else. I’ve had to force things without proper forethought because “Scott we have this marketing meeting tomorrow can you get us something to show.” And I hate it. But sometimes you have to do that. But actually for the most part, my problem isn’t getting stuck. My problem is figuring what, out of the zillion things I want to do, I will do. Which can be just as paralyzing.”

Fischer, a Savannah College of Art and Design grad, continues to illustrate both covers and entire children’s books. He’s currently based in Belchertown, MA.

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