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Brack Metal’s Pop-Influenced Imagined Worlds

Hong Kong-born, Australia-based artist Gerald Leung illustrates under the moniker “Brack Metal.” The artist’s intricate style seems to take notes from both manga and American comics, surrealism, tattoo art, and other pop culture touchstones. His character studies, in particular, appear as mash-ups without restriction.


Hong Kong-born, Australia-based artist Gerald Leung illustrates under the moniker “Brack Metal.” The artist’s intricate style seems to take notes from both manga and American comics, surrealism, tattoo art, and other pop culture touchstones. His character studies, in particular, appear as mash-ups without restriction.

“He grew up with a steady diet of comic books, video games and cartoons from both the east and the west,” a statement says. “Through these influences, he became fascinated by the concept of man-made universes. Imagined worlds not bound by reality or physics, no rules and infinite possibilities. Places that could be so vast, alive and complex but yet only existing in the creator’s mind. Through different mediums and styles in his character driven illustrations, Brackmetal aims to share with the audience an insight to his inner universe.”


You can see that execution for yourself via process materials produced by at the artist. See a video posted on his YouTube channel below.

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