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Sarah Dolby Explores Our Internal World in New Series “Creatures of Habit”

New Zealand based artist Sarah Dolby recently shared with us her new series of paintings, some of her most personal to date. Featured in Hi-Fructose Vol. 26 and on our blog, Dolby's whimsical narrative turns more dark here as she explores the emotionally turbulent world that lies within her Victorian-styled girls. Titled "Creatures of Habit", the series consists of six oil on aluminum panel paintings where she introduces new subjects: The Collector of Worries, whose collection brings her both comfort and anxiety, The White Rabbit, a reinterpretation of the character from Alice in Wonderland, and a young girl who is a prisoner of her own thoughts.

New Zealand based artist Sarah Dolby recently shared with us her new series of paintings, some of her most personal to date. Featured in Hi-Fructose Vol. 26 and on our blog, Dolby’s whimsical narrative turns more dark here as she explores the emotionally turbulent world that lies within her Victorian-styled girls. Titled “Creatures of Habit”, the series consists of six oil on aluminum panel paintings where she introduces new subjects: The Collector of Worries, whose collection brings her both comfort and anxiety, The White Rabbit, a reinterpretation of the character from Alice in Wonderland, and a young girl who is a prisoner of her own thoughts. “These works are particularly personal to me and illustrate some of the challenges myself and those around me have faced this year,” she told Hi-Fructose in an email. “As a creature of habit myself, I am drawn to recreating familiar images that try to capture that space between strength and fragility. Through my painting, I try to make sense of this on going and ever changing state of being. I use collected objects or Wunderkammer (aka cabinets of curiosities) to extend the narrative of each painting, carefully selecting from both my imagination and my own collection of treasures.”

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First featured in Hi-Fructose Vol. 26, Dunedin, New Zealand based artist Sarah Dolby has always created character driven portraits. Her paintings combine aspects of traditional portraiture with her own whimsical narrative. In her most recent work, Dolby has been exploring concepts such as time, anxiety, nature and death and the challenging role these play in our lives. "My internal world is quite chaotic," she says, "and I often only find peace when trying to make sense of this through my work."

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