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The New Contemporary Art Magazine

On View: Jenny Morgan’s “The Golden Hour” at Plus Gallery

Jenny Morgan's (featured in HF Vol. 21) paintings reveal beauty in simplicity. She often depicts nude figures with poignant expressions, stylizing their bodies to fit her sunrise-hued palette in lieu of focusing on minuscule details like hairs and wrinkles. The simplification of her subjects gives her work a glossed-over effect that pushes it from objective realism into surreal territory. For her latest exhibition "The Golden Hour" at Plus Gallery in Denver, Morgan explored notions of spirituality and the cycle of life. While her major focus has always been faces, often using herself as a subject, her exhibition features a substantial amount of paintings of skulls, alluding to the fading nature of youth and the ephemerality of the body. Take a look at the work in the show below and check out "The Golden Hour" on view through October 18.

Jenny Morgan’s (featured in HF Vol. 21) paintings reveal beauty in simplicity. She often depicts nude figures with poignant expressions, stylizing their bodies to fit her sunrise-hued palette in lieu of focusing on minuscule details like hairs and wrinkles. The simplification of her subjects gives her work a glossed-over effect that pushes it from objective realism into surreal territory. For her latest exhibition “The Golden Hour” at Plus Gallery in Denver, Morgan explored notions of spirituality and the cycle of life. While her major focus has always been faces, often using herself as a subject, her exhibition features a substantial amount of paintings of skulls, alluding to the fading nature of youth and the ephemerality of the body. Take a look at the work in the show below and check out “The Golden Hour” on view through October 18.

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