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Dex Fernandez Debuts His Eclectic Collages in New York

First covered on our blog, Dex Fernandez injects a dizzying and chaotic energy into his eclectic collage portraits. He will debut them in New York tomorrow at Owen James Gallery in a colorful installation that also includes animation. Many of the pieces in the show were created over the past few months, during an artist residency in the United States by the Asian Arts Council. To enhance the digital photographs that Fernandez has used as his canvas, he incorporates details such as neon-colored embroidery and paints. These create a frenzied, but seamless pattern strung throughout each piece, which continues onto the gallery wall with cut-paper shapes.

First covered on our blog, Dex Fernandez injects a dizzying and chaotic energy into his eclectic collage portraits. He will debut them in New York tomorrow at Owen James Gallery in a colorful installation that also includes animation. Many of the pieces in the show were created over the past few months, during an artist residency in the United States by the Asian Arts Council. To enhance the digital photographs that Fernandez has used as his canvas, he incorporates details such as neon-colored embroidery and paints. These create a frenzied, but seamless pattern strung throughout each piece, which continues onto the gallery wall with cut-paper shapes. Fernandez uses pattern as his way of communicating various themes, such as juxtapositions between good and evil, or beauty and ugliness. In the context of pattern making, he’s able to form a relationship between the pop art elements, religious symbols and found images in his work. When overlaid onto his subject’s faces, like a mask, these various elements intensify their personalities and presence.

New works by Dex Fernandez will be on view at Owen James Gallery in New York from October 30th through November 29th, 2015. Photos courtesy of Owen james Gallery.

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