Menu
The New Contemporary Art Magazine

On View: “Adrift” Group Show at Marcas Contemporary Art

For their first show of 2015, Marcas Contemporary Art features twenty artists whose works evoke a sense of misdirection and uncertainty. As the title suggests, they portray themes of longing, confusion, and instability through both subdued and vibrant pieces, spanning a variety of media. Those featured here include Jaclyn Alderete, Gabe Larson, Ken Garduno, Gosia Casey Gray, N.C. Winders, Gomez Bueno, and Amliv Sotomayer, exhibiting works characteristic of their signature styles.


Gabe Larson

For their first show of 2015, Marcas Contemporary Art features twenty artists whose works evoke a sense of misdirection and uncertainty. As the title suggests, they portray themes of longing, confusion, and instability through both subdued and vibrant pieces, spanning a variety of media. Those featured here include Jaclyn Alderete, Gabe Larson, Ken Garduno, Gosia Casey Gray, N.C. Winders, Gomez Bueno, and Amliv Sotomayer, exhibiting works characteristic of their signature styles. On the colorful side of the spectrum, Ken Garduno portrays an explosive ink portrait of a skull in his retro-inspired technique, complimented by a detailed and energetic new series by N.C. Winters. This feeling of movement is echoed in works such as Jaclyn Alderete’s softer, gestural painting of a girl stretching between activities. Perhaps the most animated piece in the show is Gomez Bueno’s marble bust “Beautiful Lies”, a classically inspired take on Pinocchio‘s famous growing nose. Whether humorous or more conceptual, each provides an unlimited definition of what it means to be “Adrift”.

“Adrift” is currently on view at Marcas Contemporary gallery in Santa Ana, CA through April 5th.


Gabe Larson


Gomez Bueno


Ken Garduno


N.C. Winters


N.C. Winters


Jaclyn Alderete


Jaclyn Alderete (detail)


Gosia


Amliv Sotomayer

Meta
Share
Facebook
Reddit
Pinterest
Email
Related Articles
South African artist Mary Sibande explores race, history, gender, and other social themes, her visceral mixed-media figures constructed from fiberglass, cotton, resin, and other materials. She uses a sculptural representation of herself, Sophie, to also look at her own family’s generational narrative. Her practice also includes photography, integrating the themes of her sculptures and installations.
Luo Li Rong’s figurative sculptures evoke movement and intrigue, whether it’s the artist’s feminine, graceful figures or her otherworldly creatures. The China-born, Belgium-based artist has received several high honors, including commissions for the 2008 Olympic Games in Beijing. A statement talks about the varied influences of the sculptor.
Across her work in sculpture, photography, installation, and performance, Julie Rrap interrogates common symbols of femininity. Her somewhat disquieting work points to the idea of gender as a performance — one that is sometimes painful and uncomfortable to execute. Well-heeled feet are at the focus of many of Rrap's works, such as her sculpture Stepping Out, which features a pair of severed women's feet that have grown fleshy heels like a sort of impractical evolutionary mechanism. The piece hints at the pressure women face to modify their bodies to fit impossible beauty standards.
Ignacio Canales Aracil presses flowers using voluminous molds that shape them into fragile vessels with a colorful, lace-like surface. Even as the seasons change, his process preserves the essence of spring. With their full forms intact, the flowers have a liveliness to them, even as they transform into these manmade shapes. Canales Aracil recently exhibited at Museo Sorolla in Madrid and currently is part of a group show on view through February 28 at Galeria Lucia Mendoza in the Spanish capital, as well.

Subscribe to the Hi-Fructose Mailing List