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On View: Dustin Yellin at the New York City Ballet

Sculptor Dustin Yellin sought to capture the energy and movement of dance in his recent installation for the New York City Ballet's Art Series, on view through March 1. The artist humorously describes his translucent pieces as "glass sandwiches": He renders each layer of a figure on a different pane of glass, using a combination of collage and painting, and fuses the various panes into a 3,000 pound glass prism. In the end result, the figure appears to float inside the glass with all its various layers revealed. The pieces are part of Yellin's larger series, "Psychogeographies," in which he maps out the ways memories are stored in the body.

Sculptor Dustin Yellin sought to capture the energy and movement of dance in his recent installation for the New York City Ballet’s Art Series, on view through March 1. The artist humorously describes his translucent pieces as “glass sandwiches”: He renders each layer of a figure on a different pane of glass, using a combination of collage and painting, and fuses the various panes into a 3,000 pound glass prism. In the end result, the figure appears to float inside the glass with all its various layers revealed. The pieces are part of Yellin’s larger series, “Psychogeographies,” in which he maps out the ways memories are stored in the body.

While the installation is on view through the end of the month, there’s one more special Art Series performance on February 27 featuring Alexei Ratmansky’s “Pictures at an Exhibition,” a new work by NYCB resident choreographer Justin Peck, and Christopher Wheeldon’s “Mercurial Manoeuvres.” Check out a video below to get some insight into Yellin’s highly detailed process.


Dustin Yellin. Photo courtesy of NYCB.

Photo courtesy of Andy Romer Photography.


Photo courtesy of Andy Romer Photography.


Photo courtesy of Andy Romer Photography.

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