Menu
The New Contemporary Art Magazine

Preview: Chris Berens’s “Nethermoor” at Roq La Rue

Dutch artist Chris Berens (featured in our book Hi-Fructose Collected 3) developed a unique painting technique that lends his work a soft focus, as if watching the fantastical world he depicts through a distorted lens. The artist combines age-old glazing techniques inspired by the Renaissance masters with layers of emulsion, plastic sheets one to three inches thick, and paper. The result is a quilted-looking texture that evokes the sensation of seeing his work through uneven layers of glass. The artist has been laying low until recently, and will debut his first US solo show in four years, "Nethermoor," at Roq La Rue in Seattle on February 5.

Dutch artist Chris Berens (featured in our book Hi-Fructose Collected 3) developed a unique painting technique that lends his work a soft focus, as if watching the fantastical world he depicts through a distorted lens. The artist combines age-old glazing techniques inspired by the Renaissance masters with layers of emulsion, plastic sheets one to three inches thick, and paper. The result is a quilted-looking texture that evokes the sensation of seeing his work through uneven layers of glass. The artist has been laying low until recently, and will debut his first US solo show in four years, “Nethermoor,” at Roq La Rue in Seattle on February 5.

Berens’s latest body has a narrative thread inspired by Michael Ende’s well-known fantasy novel The Neverending Story. Surreal characters navigate a frigid terrain filled with mysterious apparitions and supernatural occurrences. “In this place, deserts may be adjoined by snow covered plains, compass points can never be established or trusted, traveling from one end of the world to the other may take mere moments, and places right around the corner might be far beyond reach,” wrote Berens describing the world he brings to life in his new paintings. Today we bring you a first look at “Nethermoor” before it opens to the public this Thursday.

Meta
Share
Facebook
Reddit
Pinterest
Email
Related Articles

Opening tomorrow, Roq la Rue's new group exhibition "Plus One" gives their artists the opportunity to pair up with their latest inspirations. There are twelve artists in the exhibition, six selected artists and their +1's: HF Vol. 27's Stacey Rozich (+ Matt Craven), John Brophy (+ Deanna Adona), Peter Ferguson (+ Olivier Bonnard), HF Vol. 32 cover artist Travis Louie (+ Dorian Vallejo), Redd Walitzki (+ Meghan Howland), and Amanda Manitach (+ Adam Mars). Take a look at our preview after the jump.
Through a unique process of applying thin, translucent layers of monochromatic, acrylic paint to a panel over and over, Travis Louie (HF Vol. 32 cover artist) mimics the effect of 19th-century photography. Though filled with fantastical characters, his works have an effect of verisimilitude much like historical documents from the Victorian and Edwardian periods. For his latest solo show, "Archive of Lost Species," which opens at Roq La Rue Gallery in Seattle on May 7, Louie abandons the studio portrait format we've seen before. Instead, his latests works look like snapshots of strange monsters, sometimes observed in the wild and sometimes interacting with their human counterparts.

Travis Louie

Inspired by the John Foxx instrumental “A Beautiful Ghost,” the gallery Roq La Rue asked several artists “to do their take on the title theme.” The result is a group show currently running at the gallery through March 3, with work from Brian Despain, Rick Araluce, Nannette Cherry, Kai Carpenter, Travis Louie, Jeff Jacobson, Kate MacDowell, Peter Ferguson, and Bella Ormseth.
On March 5, Seattle's Roq La Rue Gallery will present two solo shows from artists with distinct aesthetic sensibilities. Sam Wolfe Connelly (who was featured in HF Vol. 32) continues his exploration of the subtly sinister with a new series of drawings and paintings called "And Here I Lay." Often set in (nearly) empty houses in remote locales, his work takes on the quality of a mysterious shadow one sees in the corner of one's eye. It has an ambiance of foreboding that can't be easily explained. The cityscapes in Liz Brizzi's concurrent show, "Anagrams," are desolate as well, but her busy mixed-media work departs greatly from Wolfe's sparse paintings. Brizzi combines digitally manipulated photography, collage, and painting on wood panel to create portraits of unpopulated metropolises that look familiar yet alien because of their stillness.

Subscribe to the Hi-Fructose Mailing List