Menu
The New Contemporary Art Magazine

On View: Maya Hayuk’s “Alles Klar” at Die Kunstagentin

Technicolor maven Maya Hayuk recently opened her solo show "Alles Klar" at Die Kunstagentin in Cologne, Germany. Sparsely hung on the gallery's white, painted-brick walls, the painter and muralist's neon creations have room to breath without overwhelming the viewer. After all, Hayuk almost solely uses neon hues, often overlapping them in kaleidoscopic patterns that subtly evoke folk art forms such as weaving. Each piece attracts the eye like a nexus of energy — as if Hayuk's intense color choices have a sort of gravitational pull. On a mural created at the entrance of the gallery, Hayuk turns up the volume, subsuming a corner of the space in refracted rainbows.

Technicolor maven Maya Hayuk recently opened her solo show “Alles Klar” at Die Kunstagentin in Cologne, Germany. Sparsely hung on the gallery’s white, painted-brick walls, the painter and muralist’s neon creations have room to breath without overwhelming the viewer. After all, Hayuk almost solely uses neon hues, often overlapping them in kaleidoscopic patterns that subtly evoke folk art forms such as weaving. Each piece attracts the eye like a nexus of energy — as if Hayuk’s intense color choices have a sort of gravitational pull. On a mural created at the entrance of the gallery, Hayuk turns up the volume, subsuming a corner of the space in refracted rainbows.

Maya Hayuk’s “Alles Klar” will be on view through November 15 at Die Kunstagentin.

Meta
Share
Facebook
Reddit
Pinterest
Email
Related Articles
Painter Rodel Tapaya ties the current social climate of the Philippines to the mythology of the past. In a recent show at Tang Contemporary, Tapaya offered new paintings with "Myths and Truths.” The surrealist images touch on evironmental and political images, in a variety of scales in this recent body of work.
Vladimir Kraynyk's work takes inspiration from art history and cutting-edge technology alike. His oil paintings of voluminous abstract forms reference the decorative arts of the Baroque period as well as contemporary 3D-rendered images. These disparate aesthetics combine to form geometric shapes that appear to be in constant motion. Forms come together and break apart like a colorful Big Bang repeating over and over again. Kraynyk has a background in graffiti, which comes through in the way his abstract shapes evoke calligraphy. Take a look at his work below.
Chicago-born artist Kayla Mahaffrey crafts portraits of subjects enveloped by pop totems and surreal elements. Her works are rendered in watercolors and acrylics, each oozing with vibrancy and candy colors. Her practice moves between illustration and fine art.
Working out of her Austin studio, Leah Haney makes paintings that aspire to create an experience akin to entering a work of architecture. Her mixed-media works are produced with the thesis that painting, much like architecture and design, can stand alone and be experienced on a purely visual level — without piled-on metaphors or subtexts. Haney began her creative journey at UT Austin, yet found a life-changing experience in visiting Florence, Italy shortly on graduating. These days, the artist can be found mostly in her Austin studio complex, constantly rearranging her studio furniture to achieve the best personal environment for creating each piece. We spoke to her about the ways architecture informs her work, her creative process, and her passion for science fiction.

Subscribe to the Hi-Fructose Mailing List