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Preview: Mark Gmehling’s “Plastic” at RWE

Mark Gmehling's 3D-rendered creations are instantly recognizable for their playful textures: rubbery legs that weave and stretch; gummy bodies that bounce off the floor; goo that drips and metal that glimmers. The artist (see our extensive interview in our current issue, Hi-Fructose Vol. 32) began as an analog illustrator and even cites graffiti as an early influence. These days, his digital illustrations lay the groundwork for prints, murals and sculptures. Gmehling has an exhibition titled "Plastic" opening tonight at RWE in his hometown of Dortmund, Germany filled with satirical, off-kilter pieces.

Mark Gmehling’s 3D-rendered creations are instantly recognizable for their playful textures: rubbery legs that weave and stretch; gummy bodies that bounce off the floor; goo that drips and metal that glimmers. The artist (see our extensive interview in our current issue, Hi-Fructose Vol. 32) began as an analog illustrator and even cites graffiti as an early influence. These days, his digital illustrations lay the groundwork for prints, murals and sculptures. Gmehling has an exhibition titled “Plastic” opening tonight at RWE in his hometown of Dortmund, Germany filled with satirical, off-kilter pieces.

Gmehling seems to have a fascination with the idea of mob mentality. Rows of identical, humanoid creatures together make up the head of another, larger person in one piece, while in another the jovial humanoids form a circle as each person sticks his head in the next one’s rear. Even when Gmehling’s work veers on the side of taboo, his dirty jokes are made endearing with the giggle-inducing imagery he creates.

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