Menu
The New Contemporary Art Magazine

Marcelo Monreal Cuts Open Pop Culture Icons to Reveal Inner Beauty

Based in Santa Catarina, Brazil, collage artist Marcelo Monreal's work is going viral for his different take on inner beauty. His latest works cut open the portraits of celebrities in Photoshop, super models and other faces of pop culture that are otherwise stagnant, to reveal beautiful blooms underneath. Monreal's use of floral motifs stems (no pun intended) from his first job as an artist, developing embroidery for a label factory. His imagery is in a similar vein to that of the spliced vintage photographs of Matthieu Bourel, covered here, and Rocío Montoya's manipulated, experimental photos. While his subjects are uniquely contemporary, Monreal shares the same sense of bizarre humor that combines the morbid with abstracted glamour.

Based in Santa Catarina, Brazil, collage artist Marcelo Monreal’s work is going viral for his different take on inner beauty. His latest works cut open the portraits of celebrities in Photoshop, super models and other faces of pop culture that are otherwise stagnant, to reveal beautiful blooms underneath. Monreal’s use of floral motifs stems (no pun intended) from his first job as an artist, developing embroidery for a label factory. His imagery is in a similar vein to that of the spliced vintage photographs of Matthieu Bourel, covered here, and Rocío Montoya’s manipulated, experimental photos. While his subjects are uniquely contemporary, Monreal shares the same sense of bizarre humor that combines the morbid with abstracted glamour. As our society’s social pathos and obsession with celebrities grows, so do the blooms behind their faces in this ongoing series. Monreal says, “If the let loose from the rest of the body, which would be within? Well, to me, still I think that people have a little bit of beauty within them by more that this is saved and only revealed in rare moments. The result of this reflection gave rise to this series called: Faces [UN]bonded.”

Meta
Share
Facebook
Reddit
Pinterest
Email
Related Articles
These dramatic images of fallen Baroque interiors are the collage work of Spanish artist Paul Genovés. He stitches together photos of nature with postcards of 17th and 18th century places that he's collected from street markets. The result is both dreamy and disturbing with a strong impact- and not too far from reality. Primarily, his subject is bodies of water, like ice floating through a Venetian palace or waves crashing down the stairs of an old theater. Recent works also show forests taking root in palace halls.
Vladislav Skobelskij, who works under the moniker Happy, creates voluminous, candy-colored scenes and animations. The delightfully garish works move between disturbing and alluring, each figure overcome by vibrant and cartoonish outgrowths. Happy often injects pop cultural and photographic elements into this fantasy world.
The stirring digital collages of Ben Owens are highlighted in a new show at Muneca Arthouse in Patchogue, New York. “Flaw Essence” collects both monochromatic and vibrant experiments from the artist. Owens says this collection of works is part of an attempt to “use bright and sometimes fluorescent colors while trying new techniques, mediums and styles.” The show opens on April 13 at the space.
Chapel Hill artist Antoine Williams, a.k.a. Raw, explores issues surrounding race and class through mixed-media installations, paintings, drawings, and collage. His work is semi-autobiographical, inspired by his experiences of a rural working class upbringing in Red Springs, North Carolina. "My art practice is an investigation of my cultural identity through the exploration of societal signs as they relate to institutional inequities," Williams explains in his artist statement. View more of his work on his Instagram and Tumblr.

Subscribe to the Hi-Fructose Mailing List