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The Recent Paintings of Mia Brownell

In the Mia Brownell series "Plate to Platelet," the painter combines the sensibility of classical still life and the scientific investigation of blood cells, examining the relationship between consumers and food. Brownell is currently involved in two shows: a duo effort with Hunterdon Art Museum with Martin Kruck titled "Skepitcal Realism" and a group show at Shiva Gallery titled "Foodie Fever." She was last featured on our site here.

In the Mia Brownell series “Plate to Platelet,” the painter combines the sensibility of classical still life and the scientific investigation of blood cells, examining the relationship between consumers and food. Brownell is currently involved in two shows: a duo effort with Hunterdon Art Museum with Martin Kruck titled “Skepitcal Realism” and a group show at Shiva Gallery titled “Foodie Fever.” She was last featured on our site here.

“She explores the realism of eating by recognizing the entanglement between the consumerist idealization of food with its biological engineering and the molecular strains that then interact with our bodies,” Hunterdon says. “The space she paints attempts to capture this paradoxical perspective, one that is equally rational and fantastical, material and in constant flux, Brownell said. She encourages viewers to consider this question: If we are what we eat, what are we becoming?”

See more of her work on her site.

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