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Li Songsong Offers New Impasto Works With ‘One of My Ancestors’

Li Songsong, known for using thick layers of paint to craft scenes that appear similar to fragmented memories, brings his historical look at China to Pace Gallery with the show "One of My Ancestors." The show, running through Dec. 21, is the first solo effort from the artist in the U.S. since 2011. Much of the imagery comes from archival and public sources, the gallery says.

Li Songsong, known for using thick layers of paint to craft scenes that appear similar to fragmented memories, brings his historical look at China to Pace Gallery with the show “One of My Ancestors.” The show, running through Dec. 21, is the first solo effort from the artist in the U.S. since 2011. Much of the imagery comes from archival and public sources, the gallery says.

“I did not deliberately look for these images,” he told Pace, “It just happened. For example, a friend of mine went to an old book stall in Beijing to buy old magazines. I saw a good photo, and then I used it. I don’t seem to care about the content of the image itself. Of course, they are a starting point, but they will affect you more on a psychological level than in a narrative way.”

See more works from the show on Pace’s site.

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