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Heather Benjamin’s ‘Lone Cowgirl’ Drawings

In Heather Benjamin's recent work, her "lone cowgirl" character moves through a spectrum of emotions, attitudes, and phases that reflect the complexity of womanhood. She offered several of these new drawings in a show at Tokyo’s gallery commune under the banner "Burden of Blossom."

In Heather Benjamin’s recent work, her “lone cowgirl” character moves through a spectrum of emotions, attitudes, and phases that reflect the complexity of womanhood. She offered several of these new drawings in a show at Tokyo’s gallery commune under the banner “Burden of Blossom.”

“Her figures embody the many facets of the artist’s psyche as she moves through different phases of womanhood,” the gallery says of her recent pieces. “This chapter of her narrative is an attempt to manifest tender strength, power, and evolution, as the untamed cowgirl is on the run from previous restraints, trauma, and past versions of herself, which, however uncomfortable and disturbing, must be acknowledged, understood, and paid homage before they are laid to rest to make room for new energy.”

Find Benjamin on the web here. See more of her work below.

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