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Rodel Tapaya’s Paintings Offer ‘Myths and Truths’

Painter Rodel Tapaya ties the current social climate of the Philippines to the mythology of the past. In a recent show at Tang Contemporary, Tapaya offered new paintings with "Myths and Truths.” The surrealist images touch on evironmental and political images, in a variety of scales in this recent body of work.

Painter Rodel Tapaya ties the current social climate of the Philippines to the mythology of the past. In a recent show at Tang Contemporary, Tapaya offered new paintings with “Myths and Truths.” The surrealist images touch on evironmental and political images, in a variety of scales in this recent body of work.

“Utilising a range of media — from large acrylic on canvasses to an exploration of under-glass painting, traditional crafts, diorama, and drawing —Tapaya filters his observations of the world through folktales and pre-colonial historical research, creating whimsical montages of his characters,” the gallery says. “Each work has its origin in Tapaya’s reflections on a particular time or place that possesses an enduring resonance, from its correspondence with the formalistic and psychological implication of the grid in his earlier works to protracted ventures which excavate and interpret myth and folk aesthetics”

See more of his work, including his sculptures, below.

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