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David Adey Pins, Assembles New Kinetic Creations

The laser-cut digital prints and pins that comprise works by David Adey, an artist based in San Diego, can be pulled from hundreds of Web or print outlets. Yet, together, they create cohesive, kinetic pieces like the powerful “Starbirth,” consisting of lips bursting out from the piece’s epicenter. All of the individual pieces are painstakingly pinned to a foam board.

The laser-cut digital prints and pins that comprise works by David Adey, an artist based in San Diego, can be pulled from hundreds of Web or print outlets. Yet, together, they create cohesive, kinetic pieces like the powerful “Starbirth,” consisting of lips bursting out from the piece’s epicenter. All of the individual pieces are painstakingly pinned to a foam board. Adey last appeared on HiFructose.com here.

Adey’s versatility is shown in how he used the same elements for an entirely different piece like “22 footer,” in which a serpent-like creature is constructed, the differing values mimicking the texture of a slithering reptile.




Adey has other work that features like body parts creating a new being or object, like the top piece, “Superstar Cluster.” Pieces like 2014’s “Halo” offer a more personalized approach, with the description reading, “Three-dimensional scan of artist’s head containing over 21k triangulated faces is unfolded and flattened in one piece.” The result is a fluorescent, elegant, map-like behemoth.


As for the artist’s latest work, the piece “Inspiration/Expiration” is a permanent public commission for the County of Sandiego. More than 3,000 clay impressions of tire treads and more than 500 colors were used to create the piece. You can find the artist on Instagram here.

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