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Albarrán Cabrera: Two Lenses, An Entire Universe

The name “Albarrán Cabrera” is a moniker for the Spanish duo Anna Cabrera and Angel Albarran. The photographers have produced work together for the past two decades, showcasing across the world and tackling new challenges and techniques together under one name. And for each new theme, the duo finds away to show each’s singular vision within a broader idea.

The name “Albarrán Cabrera” is a moniker for the Spanish duo Anna Cabrera and Angel Albarrán. The photographers have produced work together for the past two decades, showcasing across the world and tackling new challenges and techniques together under one name. And for each new theme, the duo finds away to show each’s singular vision within a broader idea.




Series like “Kαιρός (Kairos)” and “Krishna,” offer different senses of awareness. The former explores “the now,” with two consecutive photos combined, while the latter has cosmic reflections. “Being aware is not just an important part of life, it is life as we know it,” the duo says. “Using photography, we want the viewers to increase empathy and arouse interest towards their reality.”


And other times, their body of work is directly linked to third-party photographs. Take “This Is You,” a body of work that encompasses works from the duo and a stranger’s negative found in the trash. The 40-year-old family portraits, rendered anonymous with underexposure, became a launching point for a series. The idea is tethered to the pair’s broader charge: “Using photography we might not be able to answer the big questions about time, reality or space, but we are interested in exploring how a photographic image can make people think about their reality,” the duo says.

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