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Andy Krieger’s Sculptural Paintings Bring Ordinary Subjects to Life

Detroit based multimedia artist Andy Krieger is inspired by ordinary subjects from his every life, but when applied to his three-dimensional paintings, something extraordinary happens. "I make art work that straddles a boundary between two and three dimensions," Krieger writes. "Sculptural paintings with an open ended narrative, that also starts a dialogue between the piece and the viewer about perception and perspective." More like dioramas, his art makes us rethink how we look at painting.

Detroit based multimedia artist Andy Krieger is inspired by ordinary subjects from his every life, but when applied to his three-dimensional paintings, something extraordinary happens. “I make art work that straddles a boundary between two and three dimensions,” Krieger writes. “Sculptural paintings with an open ended narrative, that also starts a dialogue between the piece and the viewer about perception and perspective.” More like dioramas, his art makes us rethink how we look at painting.

Working with media that includes wood and paint, Krieger’s affinity for construction comes from 20 years spent as a carpenter. “I work from life and from photographs, some photos that are found or discarded, are given a new life and reinterpreted,” he says. His works bring a sense of dynamism and whimsy to our more humble moments: riding our first bike, or sitting by the pool on a hot summer day. Unlike the illusions by other sculptural painters like Patrick Hughes, which require a specific vantage point, Krieger’s invites us to explore and can be enjoyed from different angles.

“I am interested in different ways for people to view and interact with artwork, to get people more involved than just passively observing,” he explains. “I attempt to make as many connections as possible to an audience through color, mood, and subject matter. I change and rearrange perspectives to keep a viewer off balance so they have to check or recheck the work, trying to make more connections each time. I want to keep people invested in my work on a personal level, by making things relatable and fun. I want my work to be joyful.”

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