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Anne Harris’s Translucent Portraits

Illinois based artist Anne Harris has a Renaissance-inspired technique, but there's an emotional realism in her portraits. One of her primary interests as a painter is to portray the complex relationship between other's perceptions versus our own. Her 21st century women evoke a certain self awareness in this respect. This may result from Harris' process which involves studying her own features in the mirror while she paints. Since her early work, her style has become progressively softer and more simplified.

Illinois based artist Anne Harris has a Renaissance-inspired technique, but there’s an emotional realism in her portraits. One of her primary interests as a painter is to portray the complex relationship between other’s perceptions versus our own. Her 21st century women evoke a certain self awareness in this respect. This may result from Harris’ process which involves studying her own features in the mirror while she paints. Since her early work, her style has become progressively softer and more simplified. With soft washes and sparing detail, Harris captures luminosity of the skin and subtle movement in abstraction of the face rather than exact representations. This brings about a dramatic, almost ghostly translucence to the overall work. Through this transparency, Harris explores the concept of physical presence and what lies beneath the skin.


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