Menu
The New Contemporary Art Magazine

Barbara Tosatto Theatrical Paintings Hint at Mythological Themes

Swiss painter Barbara Tosatto’s work takes cues from the storied and symbolic. Most of her pieces focus on a solitary figure, transplanted in some vacant background, isolated from indicators of time or setting. These figures are human, but disrupted — bound in sheets and gauzy veils, or weighed down with ropes or chains. With titles like “The Tyranny of Doubt” or “The Truce” it’s hard not to see the pieces as portraits of mythological characters, embodying some archetypal human ability or curse. Mostly depicted with their faces obscured, or contorted from some type of bondage, the figures’ entrapment seems more tragic in their desolate surroundings, offering no alternative to the struggle. But their situation is still somehow noble, if seen as shouldering the weight of humanity’s conditions.

Swiss painter Barbara Tosatto’s work takes cues from the storied and symbolic. Most of her pieces focus on a solitary figure, transplanted in some vacant background, isolated from indicators of time or setting. These figures are human, but disrupted — bound in sheets and gauzy veils, or weighed down with ropes or chains. With titles like “The Tyranny of Doubt” or “The Truce” it’s hard not to see the pieces as portraits of mythological characters, embodying some archetypal human ability or curse. Mostly depicted with their faces obscured, or contorted from some type of bondage, the figures’ entrapment seems more tragic in their desolate surroundings, offering no alternative to the struggle. But their situation is still somehow noble, if seen as shouldering the weight of humanity’s conditions.

Meta
Share
Facebook
Reddit
Pinterest
Email
Related Articles
Seamus Conley's paintings feature contemplative dreamers staring out into masterfully painted vistas of thick clouds and fog. We catch them at their most private moments of contemplation, alone in the night. While his past work has focused on characters of various ages and genders, the paintings in his latest solo show, "Catch My Fade," depict mostly young boys escaping into the darkness. The spaces they inhabit are far removed from civilization and more closely resemble the landscapes of dreams than any real-life locales. "Catch My Fade" opens at San Francisco's Andrea Schwartz Gallery on April 29.
Germany native Svenja Maaß creates paintings that are understood in waves, bringing heads to turn and speculate on each’s interworkings. Creatures seem to exist on differing planes than other components of the piece. Or as one gallery says, she describes her methodology “as a process which forces her and us to rethink again and again. Only slowly are things allowed to grow together.”
Nadezda’s haunting oil paintings are studies in both order and chaos, as the artist’s fluid renderings blend intricate and abstract embellishments. A new show at Haven Gallery in Long Island, titled “Fly-By-Night,” meditates on femininity in this style. The show starts June 1 and lasts through June 18.
Marlène Mocquet is a French artist whose chimerical paintings and sculptures portray strange worlds full of quirky, animated characters. Her surreal creations often have a sense of childlike whimsy and humor; other times, they turn dark and tumultuous, and verging on grotesque.

Subscribe to the Hi-Fructose Mailing List