by CaroPosted on

Yayoi Kusama’s art is in London this month as part of a new exhibition at the Victoria Miro gallery. Her internationally known work is obsessive and overwhelming, presenting the world as a polka-dotted dream land, featured in Hi-Fructose Vol 25. The word “extraordinary” is overused in writing about contemporary art but we can make an exception for Kusama, who has been selected as one of TIME Magazine’s World’s 100 Most Influential People for conquering both the art and fashion world. “Dots are a symbol of the world, the cosmos; the earth is a dot. The sun, the moon, the stars are all made up of dots. You and me, we are dots,” she once said.

by CaroPosted on

Recently named the most popular artist of 2014, Yayoi Kusama (HF Vol. 25) has currently taken over two expansive spaces at David Zwirner Gallery in New York. Her exhibition, “Give Me Love,” which closes this week, includes a reenactment of her popular installation, “The Obliteration Room” (2002), new pumpkin sculptures, and paintings. They share the hallucinatory, obsessive, and energetic qualities we’ve seen throughout her career, something this exhibition aims to embody. More photos after the jump.

by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on


Currently on view in Mexico City’s Museo Tamayo, influential Japanese artist Yayoi Kusama’s first Latin American retrospective, “Obsesión Infinita” (or “Infinite Obsession”), features an extensive array of interdisciplinary works created from 1950 to 2014. Kusama’s career has taken many turns over the years (we covered her work at length in HF Vol. 25), but the artist has always maintained her penchant for the experimental and irreverent.

by CaroPosted on

Fans of Japanese contemporary artist Yayoi Kusama need no introduction to the Kusama pumpkin- her dotted signature motif and yes, alter ego. Her pumpkins have been famously recreated from hotel rooms to textiles and designer hand bags by Louis Vuitton. She’s even taken us inside of their surreal, organic structure, as in her Selfridges London pop-up store this time last year. So the story goes, Kusama’s family once owned a storehouse full of pumpkins during World War II, and she developed a fondness for them. Ever since, she has continually used them throughout her career as a symbol of growth and fertility. Just in time for Halloween, Victoria Miro in London is showing a new body of bronze sculptures and paintings 2 years in the making, simply titled “Pumpkins”.

by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on

“I Who Have Arrived in Heaven” is an apt title for Yayoi Kusama’s current exhibition at David Zwirner Gallery, consisting of immersive installations and new paintings that span the gallery’s three neighboring locations in New York. The 84 year old artist — whose extensive oeuvre includes paintings, novels, sculptures and multimedia installations with avant-garde underpinnings — created a series of “infinity rooms” that allow viewers to lose themselves in their endless, celestial reflections of pattern and color. Read more after the jump.

by CaroPosted on

Numbers of women artists still rank low in gallery rosters, less than 50 percent, across the world. With the exception of a few like Yayoi Kusama and Yoko Ono, women in the Japanese contemporary art world have yet to earn equal recognition. This is largely due to the historical conception that women were not suited to become professional artists. A new exhibition at Jiro Miura Gallery in Tokyo is bringing awareness to 19 emerging international women artists. “Ephemeral: Territory of Girls”, which opened on July 25th, showcases new works by Jana Brike, Amy Crehore, Virginia Mori, Ania Tomicka, Emi Adachi, Fuco Ueda, Kaori Ogawa, Miki Kato, Kimi Kuruhara, Kozue Kuroki, Satomi Kuwahara, Atsuko Goto, Yuka Sakuma, Minae Takada, Tsubaki Torii, Yumi Nakai, Yuko Nagami, Yuki Nagayoshi, Mao Hamaguchi, Miho Hirano, Shiori Matsumoto, Eri Mizuno, and Yuko Murai.