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The New Contemporary Art Magazine

The ‘Analog Collages’ of Michael Tunk

Armed with two centuries of source material and an X-ACTO knife, Michael Tunk's "Analog Collage" series offers strange, absorbing worlds and portraits. In his "The Unknown Rider" series, seen below, he offers ghostly depictions of the Old West. Elsewhere, he uses unexpected building blocks in his portraits—such as tiny versions of the creature he’s depicting.

Armed with two centuries of source material and an X-ACTO knife, Michael Tunk’s “Analog Collage” series offers strange, absorbing worlds and portraits. In his “The Unknown Rider” series, seen below, he offers ghostly depictions of the Old West. Elsewhere, he uses unexpected building blocks in his portraits—such as tiny versions of the creature he’s depicting.

“Michael Tunk takes photographs and magazines from the 1800’s-1980’s and re-contextualizes them into something beautiful,” his site says. “He takes refused detritus and spins a yarn of gold. He takes the weight from a hoarders home and fixes it into aesthetic candy. His pieces are never photoshopped, he uses only Xacto blades and what’s left of the bones in his wrists. Buy now before carpel tunnel grinds his hands to an octogenarian pugilist’s paws.”

See more of his work below. Find him on the web here.

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