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Roq La Rue Returns With ‘Lush Life 6’

Kai Carpenter

After a hiatus, Roq La Rue opens its doors again with “Lush Life 6.” The Seattle gallery re-opens on Oct. 11, continuing a string of group shows under the “Lush Life” banner that have taken place throughout its two-decade history. Owner Kirsten Anderson was busy during the two-year hiatus, founding Creatura House and a conservation/educational group.


Kai Carpenter

After a hiatus, Roq La Rue opens its doors again with “Lush Life 6.” The Seattle gallery re-opens on Oct. 11, continuing a string of group shows under the “Lush Life” banner that have taken place throughout its two-decade history. Owner Kirsten Anderson was busy during the two-year hiatus, founding Creatura House and a conservation/educational group.


Sarah Petkus


Lola Gil


Kazuki Takamatsu


Brandi Milne

In a note on Roq La Rue’s website, Anderson shared some of what she’s been up to during that time: “In those two years I travelled, started a nonprofit called Creatura Wildlife Projects (which still exists and will continue on), and I started Creatura House. CH was initially envisioned to be a shop, but over time we pivoted back to primarily focusing on art. I just can’t stay away it seems! So I figured it was a fine time, now that I was rested and reinvigorated, to return to Roq La Rue Gallery- a thing I had lovingly built over almost two decades.”


Kari-Lise Alexander


Josie Morway

The show runs Oct. 11-28. See more works from the group show below.


Bella Ormseth


Casey Curran


Camille Rose Garcia

Rebecca Chaperon

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