by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on

The natural world is a never-ending source of inspiration for Italian artist Marco Mazzoni (Hi-Fructose Vol. 20 cover artist), whose colored pencil drawings explore the worlds of pagan healers, midwives and herbalists. These women were deemed witches at various points in history, for their knowledge threatened the patriarchal power structure of the Christian church. Mazzoni specifically culls his imagery from 16th-to-18th-century Sardinian folklore, studying the region’s historically matriarchal culture. His latest exhibition of drawings, “Immune,” will open at Thinkspace in Culver City on November 8 alongside Keita Morimoto’s show “Tronie.”

by CaroPosted on

Thinkspace gallery redefines the word ‘FRESH’ with their latest group exhibition of the same name, opening this Saturday. Featuring new works by some of their favorite Contemporary artists, the show promises to not only show off their talents, it’s also a glimpse into their state of creativity and growth.  Among the participants are Joanne Nam (covered here), Alex Yanes, Ariel DeAndrea, Erica Rose Levine, Kikyz 1313 and Matthew Grabelsky, featured here. 

by CaroPosted on

“Paramnesia”, like déjà vu, refers to a supernatural phenomenon in which dreams or fantasies are confused with reality. Joram Roukes explores this concept with his exhibition of the same name, which opened last weekend at Thinkspace Gallery. Previously, Roukes’ work centered on reflections of daily life experiences reassembled in surreal, painterly scenes. For the past six months, he collected new experiences while working in Los Angeles. The result is slightly schizophrenic. Throughout, exotic animals erupt from anonymous figures performing a variety of city professions. In a way, it recalls Craola’s use of anthromorphic characters to personify dreams (covered here), only Roukes’ are sourced from a place more terrifying- reality.

by CaroPosted on

On Saturday at Thinkspace gallery, Ana Bagayan continued her foray into the deepest reaches of space with “Children of the Sun”. Her alien-like children first made their appearance in her last exhibition with Thinkspace, “There Is Time to Kill Today” (covered here). For that show, her paintings explored the unknown within the realm of her imagination. Bagayan’s latest work is inspired by something closer to home, her own cultural ancestry. “I became interested in my Armenian heritage, and that eventually led me to reading about Sumerian scrolls and ancient mythology,” she shared with Hi-Fructose on opening night. Sumerian creation myths tell the story about how the world began and people first came to inhabit it. Some theorists claim the writings offer proof of alien visitors. Bagayan tells her own version of the conception of human and animal life by an imaginary alien race of various anthropomorphic forms. Read more after the jump.

by CaroPosted on

Los Angeles based street artist Bumblebeelovesyou colors the urban landscape with stencils of children that deliver an important message. Why take the namesake of a bee? This little insect has been attributed to human survival and development because of its role as a pollinator. The bee’s endangerment due to pollution, urbanization, and other factors could mean devastation. Bumblebeelovesyou began with hanging paper mache beehives in phone kiosks, pointing to the link between rising cellphone usage and change in bee migration. Since then, his work has developed into a range of paintings, sculpture, and installations with a social and environmental focus. By telling his personal coming of age story for anyone to see, Bumblebee reminds us of the value of innocence, away from industry and technology.

by CaroPosted on

French born artist Liz Brizzi held her first solo exhibition with Thinkspace Gallery (previewed here) on Saturday. “Adrift” continues her experimentation with urban landscapes in the form of painting and photo collage. This time, Brizzi went to Asia in search of inspiration. “I’ve always loved Japan. I went there with this exhibition in mind, with a plan in my head to create my own version of it,” shared Brizzi on opening night. Among the cities represented in Brizzi’s new work are Roppongi, Tokyo and the Damnoen Saduak floating marketplace in Thailand. Seemingly uninhabited, her work celebrates the architectural design and essence of a place long after we’re gone.