by Andy SmithPosted on

In his first exhibition in Hungary, Dmitry Kawarga’s “post-human” sculptures and installations reflect on humanity’s vulnerability. His “Anthropocentrism Toxicosis” series, in particular, is on display at the Ferenczy Museum, with works built with polymers and occasionally, usage of 3D-printing processes. The exhibition runs through Sept. 15.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Armed with two centuries of source material and an X-ACTO knife, Michael Tunk’s “Analog Collage” series offers strange, absorbing worlds and portraits. In his “The Unknown Rider” series, seen below, he offers ghostly depictions of the Old West. Elsewhere, he uses unexpected building blocks in his portraits—such as tiny versions of the creature he’s depicting.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Photographer Henrik Isaksson Garnell “sculpts” his imagery with natural elements such as bones and plant matter, manmade objects, digital effects, and electronic ephemera. The result includes his new series “In Treatment,” a meditation on psychotherapy. The work moves between the cerebral and the surreal.

by Andy SmithPosted on

The cerebral paintings of Cody Seekins blend amorphous, psychedelic figures and elements of pop culture. The artist’s focus and psychological exploration within each work is not only evident in the complexity of each one, but also his accompanying narratives and context he provides when sharing a new piece.

by Andy SmithPosted on

The aspects of William Mortensen’s photography that were controversial during his lifetime—clever manipulation of imagery and dark themes—are now considered to be marks of his greatness. In the show “Witches” at Buckland Museum of Witchcraft and Magick, Stephen Romano Gallery offers both unseen work and iconic meditations on the occult from his output in the 1920s and ’30s. The exhibition runs August 3 through November 3 at the venue in Cleveland, Ohio.

by Andy SmithPosted on

In her ceramic sculptures, Janet Beckhouse taps into ancient contemplations on life, death, and nature. Though at times disconcerting, with writhing floral elements enveloping her figures, each work is executed with elegance. Beckhouse crafts these sculptures in both towering and handheld scales.