by Andy SmithPosted on

The lifesized, realistic portraits crafted by Joel Daniel Phillips currently inhabit the Fort Wayne Museum of Art in the new exhibition “Charcoal Testament.” With pencil and charcoal, the artist’s subjects have moved between the impoverished and the reality and the aftermath of nuclear testing near the Western coast.

by Andy SmithPosted on

In Federico Solmi’s “video paintings,” the artist’s electrifying style comes to life, as he scans his paintings into a game engine. During Armory Show’s 2019 edition, these particular works garnered much attention from passers-by who gravitated toward his political works. The artist’s practice also includes acrylic painting, gold and silver leaf, and other materials.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Armed with charcoal and graphite, Amandine Urruty continues to craft scenes packed with characters and surprises in every corner. In recent works, the artist’s Victorian sensibility gorgeously renders both human and pop-cultural figures alike. Urruty was featured in Hi-Fructose Vol. 44.

by Andy SmithPosted on

The glass work of Janis Miltenberger emulates natural forms, often blending human components with floral structures. The artist says she first crafts the internal structure of each piece, torching new elements into existence and adding to that foundation. Her works can take weeks or months to finish.

by Andy SmithPosted on


Brandi Milne

It’s the 51st Volume of Hi-Fructose! The spring issue features: The strange geometric paintings of Yu Maeda, the ornate head dresses of Magnhild Kennedy, collages by John Vochatzer, the powerful paintings of Sergé Gay Jr, the gravity defying art of Cintal Vidal, the elastic illustrations of Angela Ho, the dangerously dark world of Peter Ferguson, the glass sculptures of Amber Cowan, the autobiographical paintings of Stuart Pearson Wright, a review on the documentary and upcoming books of sculptor Stanislaw Szukalski, Plus a 16-page special insert section the paintings of cover artist Brandi Milne and more. HF Vol.51 arrives in April.

Pre-order a copy of the issue here!

Also, US residents can subscribe here, and Canadian residents can subscribe here.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Jim Woodring’s recent drawings include the above pen-and-ink scene, a 5-foot-wide and 3-foot-tall work depicting what the artists calls “an open-air emergency room under the full moon.” The work took nine months to complete. The revered illustrator was featured way back in Hi-Fructose Vol. 3, a feature that was later part of Hi-Fructose Collected – Volume 1.