by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on

The forces of good and evil clash in an apocalyptic new group show, “The Fall of the Watchers,” at Philadelphia’s Arch Enemy Arts. The concept of the exhibit was inspired by the Book of Enoch, an ancient Jewish text that details the tale of the Watchers, angels sent to Earth and subsequently corrupted by humanity’s hedonistic ways. While the work in “The Fall of the Watchers” is not overtly religious or even moralistic, artists like David Seidman, Caitlin Hackett, Chris Mars and Maria Teicher created a creeping, ominous mood reflective of the show’s inspiration. The participants vary greatly in style and media — from watercolor to miniature sculpture — but their work shares an underlying tension and sense of foreboding. “The Fall of the Watchers” is on view through November 2. Take a look at some work from the show below.

by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on

Currently on view at Arch Enemy Arts in Philadelphia, “Sight Beyond Sight” is a group show that explores an age-old human impulse: our aching desire to predict the future. The show’s title evokes the idea of the third eye, which symbolizes intuition and even psychic abilities in many cultures. The works in “Sight Beyond Sight” indulge in the occult and the surreal. The featured artist in the show include Naoto Hattori, who is known for painting his dreams, 100taur, whose fantasy paintings of strange creatures apprehend more than just the future of humanity, as well as Chris Leib, Aof Smith and others. The show opened on July 11 and will be on view through August 31. Take a look at some of the artwork after the jump.

by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on

“The Fourth World” is the utopian group show at Arch Enemy Arts in Philadelphia centered around the concept of a secular paradise populated by fantastical creatures (“heaven without religion,” according to the gallery). The interdisciplinary artists in the show focus on character-based 3D work. There’s Erika Sanada (Hi-Fructose Vol. 31), whose dog sculptures examine animal instincts and impulses. Then there’s the delicate, taxidermy-like works of Caitlin McCormack; the ornamented bone sculptures of Chris Haas; Doubleparlour’s mutated creations and Adam Wallacavage’s tentacled chandeliers. While the idea of “The Fourth World” hints at an idealized wonderland, there are notes of darkness in many of the works. But for a group of artists with a penchant for surrealism, there’s really no other way.