by CaroPosted on

Earlier this month, we shared with you the intriguing embroidered installations by Beijing based artist Gao Rong, uncanny and realistic replicas of her childhood home in inner Mongolia. Using the Chinese embroidery she learned growing up as her primary technique, Rong was able to create stunning copies of artifacts from her memories for that series. Her new series applies the same handicraft but to a much more minimal, even painstaking degree. Aptly titled “The Simple Line”, Rong goes in the opposite direction of her complicated and detailed spaces and embraces simplicity and abstraction.

by CaroPosted on

First featured in Hi-Fructose Vol. 15, North Carolina based artist James Marshall aka Dalek was exposed to punk rock, skateboarding and painting graffiti early on. His earlier works feature abstract illustrations of characters, strongly influenced by his time as an assistant to Japanese Pop artist Takashi Murakami, and over the years, have progressed into more geometrical works. Dalek has always liked things that are “super flat” and graphic, and he approaches his art with a mathematical sensibility. His paintings today feature geometric shapes that seem to morph when viewed from different angle.

by CaroPosted on

Originating from the New York graffiti scene, where he was known as “REAS”, artist Todd James (covered here) has become instantly recognizable for his colorful abstract style and erotic sense of humor. You may also know him as the artist who designed logos for the Beastie Boys, or Miley Cyrus’ outlandish backup bear dancers. Some have compared James’ creative style to a child’s for his use of cartoony lines and forms, which he combines with adult subjects. He has described his art as a sort of “horrible cartoon”, influenced by UPA (United Productions of America) animations. His latest solo exhibition “Fly Like the Wind” recently opened on Saturday at Nanzuka Underground gallery in Tokyo.

by CaroPosted on

Dallas, Texas based artist Michael Reeder paints eclectic portraits that explore ideas about identity. Reeder is fascinated by the various characteristics that define us, and his works mix those elements both stylistically and conceptually. While his main interest is modern identity, the figures he portrays often have a classical quality. He renders their faces as if he were chiseling away at marble, redefined with abstract and exaggerated features with blank eyes (ancient statue eyes were painted or inlaid.) His portraits aren’t meant to be accurate representations. Rather, he considers portraiture to be more like a reinvention of his subjects, which takes place at their simplest form. 

by CaroPosted on

Op art works are abstract, and while mostly in black and white, UK artist Carl Cashman usually infuses his with clashing neon colors. Using geometry and optical illusion, his works depict hidden symbols and movement, as in bold patterns that appear to flex and warp. Cashman (covered here) enhances these qualities with a style that he calls “Neometry”. Unlike completely abstracted art, which bears no trace of anything recognizable, Cashman’s sees his art as a sort of biography. The inspiration behind his latest series of acrylic works, titled “An Edited Version of Life”, references moments in his daily life.

by CaroPosted on

Los Angeles based artist Dave Kinsey (HF Vol. 13) will debut geometric landscapes in his upcoming solo exhibition with FFDG Gallery in San Francisco on Friday. In “The Modern Condition”, Kinsey continues to walk the line between the natural world and his abstract perceptions of it. His exhibit features 9 acrylic and collage works on canvas that portray boldly colored giant figures and structures erupting from a barren environment.