by Nick PizanaPosted on

Throughout time, flowers have stood as symbols of beauty. Their vibrant color and pleasant aroma has made them integral parts of rituals around the world. To see them as bouquets and arrangements in the background is common in many cultures. Floral artist Kirk Cheng pays tribute to flowers by making attention grabbing displays, which take beauty that is normally glanced over and push it to the center of attention. Cheng creates wall gardens of seasonal plants, drawing the symbolism found in the plant’s color or species. Behind the glass of sleek dioramas, they look like perfectly preserved specimens from some other dreamy world.

by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on

Tristan Eaton has been involved in many high-profile art projects, though you might not know it. The artist formerly created street art and guerrilla installations under the monicker TrustoCorp (featured in HF Vol. 22) while simultaneously running a design studio that served many big-name clients. Recently, he stepped away from both projects to focus on personal work. Eaton has been traveling the globe and painting murals for a large part of the past year and a half and is debuting his first solo show (as Tristan Eaton) in seven years, “Changing the Subject” at Above Second Gallery in Hong Kong, on October 30. The exhibition features a series of collage-like paintings. Within each piece, Eaton hand-paints cartoon characters, typography and realist portraits, weaving them into a dreamlike semblance of the cacophony of pop culture images we’re exposed to on a daily basis.

by Ysabelle CheungPosted on

It’s all too easy to walk through life in a robotic daze, ignoring pressing issues right in front of our eyes. However, the current show at Above Second Gallery in Hong Kong, “Somedays Somedaze,” intends to snap you out of the dreamy and sometimes destructive somnambulism of daily life. In this show, Hong Kong based artist collective Parents’ Parents (see our earlier profile of them here) and Singapore native Kristal Raelene Melson pair up to discuss a host of contemporary issues and reflections as a response to society and mass consumption, and the ever-present question of what it means, or takes, to be human in today’s world.