by Ken HarmanPosted on

With the sixteenth L.A. Art Show just five days away, Los Angeles is kicking into full gear for one of the larger art events of the year. In addition to all the fairs, exhibitors and pop up shows are of course the upcoming parties. Right now on the 51st floor of the Ritz Carlton (across from the Staples center) the L.A. Art Machine is busy installing for the fair’s VIP after party, which is scheduled to be hosted by Shepard and Amanda Fairey. Three of the west coast street art greats, Mear One, Chor Boogie and Shark Toof are now painting the walls, floors and ceilings of the penthouse for the coming celebrations. Get a first-look at the space and murals in progress, here on Hi-Fructose.

by Andy SmithPosted on


Aaron Marshall

Laluzapalooza, the annual group show from La Luz De Jesus Gallery, returns in March with more than 70 artists featured. As in previous years, Laluzapalooza 33 has no stated theme, and submissions come from artists working a variety of fields. The gallery says visitors can see taent ranging from “ever-growing roster of feature artists, alongside a promising batch of previously undiscovered, emerging talent.”

by Andy SmithPosted on


Travis Louie

Inspired by the John Foxx instrumental “A Beautiful Ghost,” the gallery Roq La Rue asked several artists “to do their take on the title theme.” The result is a group show currently running at the gallery through March 3, with work from Brian Despain, Rick Araluce, Nannette Cherry, Kai Carpenter, Travis Louie, Jeff Jacobson, Kate MacDowell, Peter Ferguson, and Bella Ormseth.

by Andy SmithPosted on


John Vochatzer

A group show running at Arch Enemy Arts highlights artists either inspired by or directly working in collage. Running until Aug. 25, “Mélange” brings a diverse array of creators to the Philadelphia space. The show features Alex Eckman-Lawn, Angela Rio, David Krovblit, Dewey Saunders, Eduardo Recife, Jake Messing, John Vochatzer, Moon_Patrol, Pierre Schmidt, Vahge, and Visual Stones.

by Andy SmithPosted on


Krista Perry

Siblings Sid and Marty Krofft were the architects of television shows and surreal puppetry that inspired generations, garnering the biggest influence in the 1960s and ’70s with designs for “Hanna-Barbera’s Banana Splits” and “H.R. Pufnstuf.” Now, La La Land Gallery curator Kii Arens has assembled a group show to pay tribute. The Krofft Super Art Show opens on Aug. 26 at the Los Angeles gallery.

by Andy SmithPosted on


New York artist Martin Wittfooth continues to explore the relationship between the contemporary experience and nature with a new show at Corey Helford Gallery titled “The Archaic Revival,” which runs through Oct. 29 at the space. The title of the show comes from ethnobotanist and philosopher Terence McKenna, who held a theory that society was reverting back to archaic values and norms in order to heal itself from a modern, poisonous condition. The artist, a Toronto native, is currently based in Brooklyn.