by Andy SmithPosted on

The work of Margaret Curtis moves between provocative and quiet moments, each reflecting both on our current social climate and the act of painting itself. She has said that her process is “a geological process of layering and erosion.” In a statement, she offers some insight into the more consistent themes in her paintings over time:

by Andy SmithPosted on

Illustrator Selin Çınar crafts unexpected elements tucked inside familiar forms. Creating work under the moniker “Axstone,” the artist is able to move between the worlds of exhibiting and character design. She also implements varying techniques in the pieces, with elements of pointillism, clean linework, and a less controlled approach sometimes appearing in the same piece. Çınar is a member of the illustrator collective Krüw.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Using stills from early propaganda films or frontier paintings as a basis, the layered paintings of Joshua Hagler deconstruct our history. Each work goes through several iterations, distorting and removing previous layers to arrive at something new entirely. The explorations become both visceral and introspective in this process.

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Painter Mu Pan’s massive scenes, often adorned with monstrous figures and epic battles, carry details that add both humor and intrigue to the works. In a recent show at Joshua Liner Gallery in New York City, titled “Bright Moon Shines on the River,” a set of recent works pushes this notion further. A feature on the artist’s work was featured in Hi-Fructose Vol. 44.

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Greece-based artist Wild Drawing has a knack for creating absorbing, off-kilter murals on multiple surfaces. He also tends to use otherwise nondescript elements of structures and recontextualizes them, matching hues and creating depth otherwise not present on his enormous canvases. The artist often implements cerebral themes, offering universal, approachable work on walls across the world.

by Andy SmithPosted on


Handcrafted with charcoal pencils and sticks on white paper, Marina Fridman‘s massive installation “Omniscient Body” is actually a single, enormous drawing. The piece, at 74-feet-by-14-feet, is installed at the Fosdick-Nelson Gallery at Alfred University, as part of the artist’s MFA thesis exhibition. The celestial forms offer a chance “to approach the celestial body of Mars at their own scale, to be towered over by one of the rings of Saturn, and to look up at planet Earth and the Moon as though from a great distance.”