by Andy SmithPosted on

The oil paintings of Vasilis Avramidis blend architecture with writhing, organic forms that appear both figurative and alien. In the new show “Host” at Hiro Gallery in Tokyo, several new works from the artist are collected. The show runs June 10 through June 29. Avramidis was last featured on HiFructose.com here.

by Nathan SpoorPosted on

Oil painter Vasilis Avramidis, first featured in Hi-Fructose Vol. 26, produces modern portraits of isolated landscapes, often depicting architecture in states of overgrowth. At the time of this interview, Avramidis confessed that he has settled in to his third studio location this year, a small studio in northern Greece. It is here that he has been putting the finishing touches on a new group of dramatically lit scenes based on memory and the overlooked. According to Avramidis, these paintings are as much about creating a familiar sense of place within a moment as they are about the absence of humans within the architecture. His latest works will be on view at The Contemporary London, located at Space W10 which opens on November 13th.

by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on

Interested in the ways history is preserved through artifacts, Vasilis Avramidis (first featured in Hi-Fructose Vol. 26) paints mossy scenes that look like still lifes arranged for a painting and left forgotten centuries ago. Vestiges of architecture can be found within Avamidis’s overgrown landscapes in his new “Resort Archeology” series, where manmade objects appear obsolete and subjected to the indifferent passage of time. Coupled with minimalist, architectural designs that protrude from the flora, the Vanitas elements appear to refer to shifting ideals — not just in the history of art, but in Western culture in general. Avramidis will present the “Resort Archeology” series with The Contemporary London at the London Art Fair, January 15-19.

by Jane KenoyerPosted on


Vasilis Avramidis’s paintings of decaying gardens that spill over still lifes uniquely depict the notion of time passing. These symbolic motifs mix the classic tradition of still life paintings with that of sweeping landscape vistas. The result are lush and misty hues of green moss, ivy, and trees that contrast beautifully with the more formal architectural structures that seem to have been overgrown. Look closely and you will spot a few caretakers. See more after the jump!

by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on

To coincide with Frieze Art Fair in London this week, Saatchi Gallery is presenting a large group show titled “The Future Can’t Wait.” For the exhibition, 60 emerging and mid-career artists will be shown together in the historical Victoria House October 14 through 18. Vasilis Avramidis (featured in HF Vol. 26) shared a preview of his new paintings, which will be exhibited at the event. Inspired by the passage of time, Avramidis’s new works depict shadowy scenes that combine elements of landscape and still life. Architecture is overgrown with moss, demonstrating the ways that life goes on with or without human presence. Take a look at his new works below.

by Andy SmithPosted on


John Greenwood

In a new show at Arthouse1 London, the artistic element of light is explored through a collection of artists who utilize the source in different ways. “The Sky’s Gone Out” features the work of Vasilis Avramidis, Gordon Cheung, Sean Dawson, Bella Easton, John Greenwood, Chris Hawtin, Rui Matsunaga, John Stark and Mimei Thompson. (The show was curated by Easton and Hawtin.)