by CaroPosted on

Los Angeles based painter Josh Agle, better known as “Shag”, celebrated the opening of his latest solo offering “Jungle Drums” over the weekend at Corey Helford’s new massive 12,000 square ft space in Los Angeles. Previously featured on our blog over the years, the artist is well known for his mid-20th century modern architecture and design inspired works that depict candy-colored characters in stylish surroundings. For his exhibition, “Jungle Drums”, influenced in part by Tiki carvings and mythology, Shag translated this art form into his own “Shag style” with new largescale paintings and Tiki god sculptures. He jokes that, at first, “I just wanted to paint women in sexy tiger fur outfits”, and there are plenty of girls in cat suits throughout, but there is a level of sophistication to the way that Shag presents them.

by Ken HarmanPosted on

Artist Josh Agle, better known as Shag, has an impressive retrospective now on view at the Grand Central Arts Center in Santa Ana, CA. Entitled ‘Hand Pulled’, the exhibition is an overwhelming survey of every single screen print, etching and pigment print the artist has created over the course of his decade-plus long career. Most of the works are long sold out and this is the ideal opportunity for fans and lovers of libations, tiki and general swank debauchery to view, and purchase, Shag’s first works from 1999 all the way until present day. With over 250 pieces on display, ‘Hand Pulled’ presents a comprehensive look at the artists work and growth in narrative.

On Saturday, August 6th, Shag will be celebrating the closing of the show by signing merchandise and the show poster (available for a $20 minimum donation) that benefit the Japanese relief efforts. He will be releasing a new etching with GCAC that day and as an added bonus, immediately following the signing GCAC will also see the release and group signing of the ‘Suggestivism’ book, curated by Nathan Spoor (see our show coverage here.) Opening night photos courtesy of Derek Bahn after the jump.

by Ken HarmanPosted on

For his return to Jonathan LeVine Gallery, Josh Agle (aka Shag) expands upon his repertoire to present “Ambergris”. Fueled by nautical nightmares and a return to surfing, “Ambergris” explores conceptual themes of finding desire in the discarded, all in subdued retro tones. On view concurrently in the gallery right now is also Jean Labourdette (aka Turf One)’s debut solo at the gallery, “The Rising”. Since first being impressed upon seeing the Parisian artist’s work at the old Thinkspace a couple years back, we’re glad to see Labourdette expand on his hyper realistic facial details, extraordinary installations and gypsy aesthetics. Get a look at both bodies of work after the jump.

by Andy SmithPosted on


Travis Lampe

With more than 30 artists in tow, Outré Gallery pays tribute to Hieronymus Bosch’s masterwork “Within The Garden of Earthly Delights” in a new group show. Each artist has taken aspects of the work and crafted a piece within their own sensibilities, whether a few characters in the painting, an entire panel, or just one of its themes. The line-up includes Allison Sommers, Alex Eckman-Lawn, Alex Kuno, Hi-Fructose co-founder Annie Owens, Bill Crisafi, Brackmetal, Brandi Milne, Brad Gray, Charles Schneider, Davor Gromilovic, Ian Ferguson, Jesse Jacobi, Kiko Capile, Medusa Wolf, Meagan ‘Magpie’ Rogers, Moon Patrol, Nathan Reidt, Paul Barnes, Parker S. Jackson, Peca, Travis Lampe, and several others.

by Andy SmithPosted on


Shag

Twenty-one years after La Luz de Jesus Gallery first explored the faux-Polynesian “Tiki” culture with lowbrow artists reinterpreting the mid-20th-century phenomenon, the Los Angeles spot is back with two shows. “The Art of Tiki: 21st Anniversary Art of Tiki Show & No False Idols” is a two-parter that offers both “contemporary artistic interpretations of the Tiki art form and vintage Tiki originals from which the modern movement sprang.”

by Andy SmithPosted on


We’ve noticed that graphic designer/artist Kii Arens likes fruit. Whether it’s fruit made to look like other food or something entirely inedible like a briefcase, Arens both highlights the inherent beauty of the food group and bends it to his will. Above and below, you can see the several ways the artist works fruit into his work, whether it’s promotional posters or personal prints.