by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on

Today, we bring you our final round-up of highlights from Pow Wow Hawaii. The street art festival, which ran in Honolulu February 8 through 15, featured a wide variety of artists from different backgrounds. Artists like Kofie, Cope2 and Apex, whose current work evolved from old school graffiti, painted beside street art innovators like Ron English, Vhils, Insa and Roids (the last two artists’ collaborative mural was altered by hand every day to create a GIF after the week of painting), as well as too many established and emerging artists to count. If you missed any of our Pow Wow 2014 coverage, check out our special features on murals by James Jean, Kofie, Nychos and Buff Monster, Tristan Eaton and Wayne White, and see Pow Wow Hawaii 2013 Recap Part 1 here. Now that the festival is over, take a look at our final photo recap after the jump.

by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on

Well-known interdisciplinary artist, set designer and puppeteer Wayne White was invited to participate in the Honolulu street art festival Pow Wow Hawaii, but since White found his mural painting skills to be a bit on the rusty side, he decided to set up a make-shift studio in the upstairs of Pow Wow’s Lana Lane headquarters to contribute to the event through a different creative expression. White spent the week of February 8-15 indoors creating wearable, albeit very cumbersome, puppet-masks using cardboard and spray paint. Two of his creations, one with purple skin and a hoop nose ring and the other with a green complexion that matched his hat, represented surreal graffiti writer personas. Meanwhile, the third puppet was a tribute to Elvis with his signature curled lip. Check out our exclusive Hi-Fructose video of White’s puppets in action as well as some behind-the-scenes photos from his temporary Honolulu studio.

by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on

Street art festival Pow Wow Hawaii officially ended on February 15, and all there’s left to do now is tend to our sunburns and go home. Throughout last week, we wandered through Honolulu’s Kaka’ako neighborhood and observed a group of world class artists creating murals that added color to the city’s mundane landscape. Many of the walls at Pow Wow were collaborative efforts: Some artists who teamed up, like DabsMyla and Misery, were longtime friends and colleagues, while others, like Meggs and Bask, had never worked together and faced the challenge of joining their creative processes (and sharing a lift!). Here you will find a round up of photos of some of the highlights from the week of painting. Of course, there were too many great murals to choose from, so stay tuned for Part 2 of the recap tomorrow!

by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on

With a background in both graffiti and toy design, LA-based artist Tristan Eaton combines illustration elements in his bold, collage-like murals. The street art festival Pow Wow Hawaii wrapped up this past weekend in Honolulu, and over the course of the six days of painting, we tracked Eaton’s progress as he tackled an enormous wall. Eaton created a silhouette — which looms over passersby down below like an exaggerated shadow — filled with with figurative elements that add up to an almost abstract composition. From mid-century-inspired illustrations to baroque patterns, the various pieces that make up the complete work were executed entirely freehand with spray paint, without the use of stencils. Take a look at some photos of the making of the mural after the jump.

by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on

Though Pow Wow Hawaii is a mural festival, it is not just for street artists. James Jean (Hi-Fructose Vol. 30 cover artist) — who already wears multiple hats as a painter, illustrator and designer — created his first ever hand-painted mural for the event. Delicately rendered with spray paint for the skeleton and brushes for the details, the piece (which Jean still referred to as a drawing out of habit) depicts a delicate, nymph-like character emerging from baroque adornments of ribbons and leaves.

by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on

Augustine Kofie began his career as a graffiti writer over two decades ago, but his desire to master the art of the spray can lead him to develop the abstract style and vintage-inspired color palette for which he is known. Kofie is currently working on a mural for the ongoing street art festival Pow Wow Hawaii in Honolulu. Hi-Fructose got a chance to go up on the lift with him to chat while he painted. Kofie showed us his initial sketch (something he rarely reveals), which he renders in a combination of traditional and digital media. Read more after the jump.