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Check out videos featuring several of the artists featured in Hi-Fructise vol.14: Van Arno, Lola, Gregory Euclide, and Hi-Fructose favorites Travis Louie (HF vol.5), Nathan Spoor (HF featured writer and artist), Audrey Kawasaki (HF vol.6), Camille Rose Garcia (HF vol.8), and many more.

On January 24th, Gen Art members celebrated the 2010 Grammys at the private Opening Exhibition and Party of artist portraits of Grammy-nominated artists, curated by artist Kris Lewis, with support from will.i.am.

As a follow up to last year's successful "Worlds on Fire" artist exhibition, this year will.i.am, Dipdive, and the Grammy Foundation will present "Who Killed the Music?" art collection that will help kick-off Grammy Week at The Target Terrace on January 24th-27th . The gallery will host 15 pieces from the hottest contemporary surrealist artists, which will present a new and powerful perspective on the state of music today.

A portion of the proceeds for all works sold will be donated to the Grammy Foundation and i.am Scholarship Foundation.


Be sure to click the Playlist button on the video below to see more videos from Van Arno, Lola, Gregory Euclide, and Hi-Fructose favorites Travis Louie, Nathan Spoor, Audrey Kawasaki, Camille Rose Garcia, and many more!
Illustrator-turned-fine artist Janice Sung’s figures seem at home amidst natural settings, whether in a lily pad pond or a garden, floating like a near-translucent milk specters. Her recent gallery showing at Gallery Nucleus in Los Angeles, the first using physical media by the artist. We asked the artist a few questions about her new body of work and about transitioning from digital to physical media. Click the above already and read the hifructose.com exclusive interview.
Chris Peters, an artist who emerged out of the Pop Surrealist movement, has used A.I. in a new way to create paintings of landscapes that don’t actually exist. Using an algorithm "capable of 'learning' and 'predicting,'" Peters fed the system a trove of curated landscape paintings. Soon, the A.I. was able to produce new digital images, and after processing and curating those landscapes, Peters painted his favorites in oil.
Paola Delfín’s riveting murals, though monochromatic, are teeming with life on walls across the world. The artist’s recent works, adorning structures in Belgium, Cuba, and Cayman Islands, move between eye-level and towering works, such as the The Crystal Ship piece shown above and below. The artist was born in Mexico City.
Clive Barker, the British artist, film director, and author, comes to the Copro Gallery in Santa Monica with a new show. “Wunderkammer,” running Aug. 6-27, focuses on the artist’s neo-expressionist paintings. Like Barker’s work in other mediums, the subject matter leans toward fantasy and horror imagery. But as the title suggests (translated to mean the “Cabinet of Curiosities” of the Renaissance), there’s both a playful and mysterious nature to this body of work.
Public art and murals add an imaginative dimension to the daily humdrum of city life — a cause public art project Forest For The Trees is championing in Portland at Hellion Gallery. The gallery is currently hosting a two-week pop-up fundraiser show for FFTT, which is gearing up for a mural series in late August featuring the likes of Blaine Fontana, DAL, Faith47, Know Hope, Mary Iverson and many other international and Portland-based artists. The current group show at Hellion Gallery features works from a small selection of artworks from some of the participants: an assemblage by Fontana, psychedelic paintings by Brendan Monroe, a landscape collage by Mary Iverson and more. The exhibition is on view through May 30. Stay tuned for news about the Forest For The Trees mural series later this summer.
Both based in Berlin by way of Australia, Two One and Reka (see our recent studio visit here) are exhibiting together at StolenSpace Gallery in London in two concurrent solo shows: Reka's "Trip the Light" and Two One's "The Hunted Hunter's Head." Inspired by the graceful movements of dancers from a young age, Reka (whose mother was a ballerina) presents a series of paintings that pay homage to the fluid, abstract shapes the body can make. His Cubist-inspired paintings might have one imagining a toe-tapping soundtrack of jazz or even the swell of a symphony, but Reka tempers these allusions to older, more traditional art forms with gritty paint textures that evoke his graffiti roots.
Vitaly Tsarenkov takes visual cues from 8-bit console games and early 3D animation yet crafts paintings on canvas, murals, and sculptures. The Russian artist transitioned from primarily graffiti work under the moniker SY to major gallery shows and crafting murals for festivals across the world. The artist's works are held in private collections in France, Morocco, Russia, and beyond. The below works are acrylic paintings.
Whether on a wall or canvas, you can feel the influences of pop, graffiti culture, advertising, and both high- and low-brow art in James Reka’s work. The artist maintains both a mural and gallery practice in this sensibility, presenting the figurative in both vibrant and unexpected ways. Reka was last mentioned on HiFructose.com here, and he was featured in Hi-Fructose print publication in Vol. 17.
For its "15 Years of Thinkspace" show, Thinkspace Projects asked more than 70 artists to craft works on 15"x15" panels. Among the featured artists are several veterans of our print magazine, including Cintal Vidal (Vol. 51), Jeremy Geddes (Vol. 15), Mark Dean Veca (Vol. 23), Yosuke Ueno (Vol.10), Laura Berger (Vol. 44), and several others. (See the complete list of artists below.) The show kicks off on Jan. 11 and runs through Jan. 25.
Artist and animation director Joe Vaux paints what he likes. His personal work is teeming with impish demons. His cheerful hellscapes are populated with lost souls, sharp toothed monstrosities, and swarms of wrong-doers. And yet, there’s an innocence to all of this. Click to read the Hi-Fructose exclusive interview with Joe Vaux.
In a new show at Itinerrance Gallery in Paris, Inti offers a new collection of works on canvas and installations that take influence from his massive murals across the world. The artist’s surreal scenes combine textures and iconography from cultures and histories from across the globe. The show runs through March 17 at the gallery.
Last weekend, Thinkspace Gallery debuted "New Works" by Tran Nguyen and Erik Jones, who both treat the classic human form with abstract elements. Although separated by choice of color and medium, this exhibition seamlessly merges their illustrative styles. The new work of Brooklyn-based Erik Jones clothes his nudes in highly saturated patterns and geometrical shapes. The happy, bright colors of the foreground seem to mask a melancholy expressed by Jones’s subjects. This tension is intentional; Jones offers the idea of opposing visual relationships by merging beautifully rendered portraits with mixed media “fashions." With fashion serving as an inspiration, his “models” convey the indifference of one caught off guard or a moment in time. In some cases, the figure disappears completely. Read more after the jump.
Growing up in rural Colorado, Oregon based artist David Rice forged a special connection with his environment, which he develops in his colorful illustrations. His works focus on themes of nature through figurative portrayals of animals. Rice forges a link between the natural world and what is man-made in his current exhibit, "Two Creeks" at Antler Gallery, which is showing alongside Syd Bee's "In My Bones". In a new series of nine acrylic on wood panel paintings, Rice portrays wild animals with unnatural elements. A recurring element is fabric, which appears as clothing fashioned as cloaks that the animals wear, draped over their backs like blankets, or in more subtle forms.
Though several of Dan Lydersen’s oil paintings are contemporary in content, the engine that fuels these works consists of timeless bouts with spirituality, nature, and materiality. There's a surreal quality some; a somber realism in others. Yet, in each piece, Lydersen’s knack for evoking introspection carries. The backdrops move between suburbia, rural America, and more scenic, wild settings in which the ordinary Western experience (like kids on a bounce house) is extracted and dispatched.
Josh Keyes further pushes his signature "eco-surrealism" with a new collection of acrylic paintings under the title "Implosion." The new show at Thinkspace Gallery takes us to a post-human time, a bleak reality in which the natural world goes on despite the chaos we wreaked upon it. In this world, human artifacts and even animals are adorned with graffiti, our final communication with a planet we put in peril.
Brandi Milne’s pop-surrealist, acrylic paintings are both sweet and strange, each a peek into the artist’s modern-day and childhood influences. A new body of work "Once Upon a Quiet Kingdom," is collected in a show at Corey Helford Gallery in Los Angeles, which kicked off on Saturday. This is her fourth solo exhibition.
Peter Saul’s surreal acrylic paintings have reflected, challenged, and parodied the status quo for the past six decades. In a new show at Mary Boone Gallery in New York, titled “Fake News,” Saul tackles the era of Trump in a new collection of paintings that rethink pieces of art history in the process. Saul was last mentioned on HiFructose.com here.
Amy Crehore brings her joyful paintings to La Luz de Jesus Gallery with the aptly named "Bathers, Buskers & Cats." The show, running through Dec. 1 at the Los Angeles space, offers a set of oil on linen works that move through time, cultures, and touches of surrealism, all while staying true to that title.
Painter Peter Ferguson returns to Roq La Rue Gallery with "Skip Forward When Held," bringing his sensibility that blends notes of the Dutch Renaissance, Lovecraftian creatures, and more. The show, running through January 25 at the space, brings new oil paintings to the space. Ferguson was last featured on our site here.

Jessica Stoller's porcelain sculptures both examine art-historical notions of the material and how the female body has been depicted. Her current show at PPOW Gallery in New York City, titled “Spread,” offers new pieces from the artist. The show runs through Feb. 15 at the space.

Vibrant and bold, Oscar Joyo’s latest body of work which was exhibited at Thinkspace Projects in Los Angeles, vibrates the retina; while delving into his childhood memories childhood in Malawi and themes of Afrofuturism.
Deedee Cheriel’s new paintings, offering explorations of connectedness and spirituality, are part of a current show at KP Projects in Los Angeles. The paintings in "Cosmic Connections," often featuring human-animal hybrids, display scenes set against nature. Cheriel’s work was last seen on HiFructose.com here.
Portland based artist Adam Friedman (covered here) has an ongoing fascination with our universe which he explores in his psychedelic works. His art expands on broad themes centered on time and space and other natural phenomenon. Friedman goes "Into the Aether" with his latest solo exhibition, now on view at Mirus Gallery in San Francisco. His show presents a new series of acrylic and acrylic aerosol pieces on canvas, 3D paintings, and a new mural inside the gallery.
The work of Philadelphia based artist Yis Goodwin, aka "Nosego" (covered here) is instantly recognizable for his psychedelic portrayal of animals morphing into their surroundings. Nosego's new series leads us through the artist's subconscious in his exhibit at Thinkspace Gallery, "Along Infinite River". The show, which opened last Saturday, features a variety of multimedia pieces including acrylic on panel paintings, drawings and an installation of colorful wall mounted sculptures.
Josh Keyes (HF Vol 12 cover artist) and Brin Levinson (covered here) both illustrate an affinity for animals in their paintings. Working in acrylic and oil respectively, their collective exhibition "Reclamation of Nowhere", which opens tomorrow at Antler Gallery in Portland, illustrates desolate environments from the animal's point of view. Josh Keyes chose to convey feelings of liberation and reclamation in his new series. "It is suggesting surrender, or letting go, or loosening of the psychological framework and preconceptions that can sometimes hold and restrain our imagination and natural impulses," he explains. Check out our preview after the jump.
Scotland-born sculptor Philip Jackson has crafted faithful depictions of Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart, Mahatma Gandhi, and Sir Matt Busby and served as the Royal Sculptor to Queen Elizabeth II. Yet, Jackson’s also known for his modernist, dramatic gallery works, with characters that are less specific and in many cases, eerie and haunting. The quality present each of these works is Jackson’s seasoned knack for form and inspiring awe.
Hell’O, also known as Hell’O Monsters, is a collective of Belgian artists who use individual talents to create work within a cohesive, bizarre fictional world. The trio was born out of Jerôme Meynen, François Dieltiens, and Antoine Detaille meeting in the 1990s, and they populate their works with hybrid beasts taking part in both humorous and bleak narrative scenes. The works shown below are examples of the group’s acrylic paintings.
Houston-born artist Shayne Murphy blends realism and the abstract, with his oil paintings featuring explosions of graphite. Using sharpened backdrops and geometric flourishes, the artist tilts perspectives and toys further with reality. Murphy currently has a solo show titled “Fluorescent Gray” at Anya Tish Gallery in Houston, which runs through Nov. 12.

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